Información

Nelson Mandela o Madiba, tal y como le conocen los sudafricanos, es seguramente uno de los mejores ejemplos para hablar de política y diplomacia. Aunque en sus inicios formó parte de una lucha armada en contra del apartheid (política basada en la separación de razas) y por ello fue condenado a 27 años de cárcel, Mandela fue el máximo responsable de llevar a cabo una transición hacia la liberación de manera pacífica. En 1994 se convirtió en presidente de Sudáfrica después de que Frederick de Klerk, máximo mandatario de la república aceptara su liberación y comenzaran a trabajar juntos en el camino hacia la paz. De hecho, un año antes en 1993, ambos compartieron el Premio Nobel de la Paz.

Su biografía

Various pictures of Nelson Mandela

Early Years

Rolihlahla Mandela was born in Mvezo, a village near Mthatha in the Transkei, on July 18, 1918, to Nonqaphi Nosekeni and Henry Mgadla Mandela. His father was the principal councillor to the Acting Paramount Chief of the Thembu. Rolihlahla literally means “pulling the branch of a tree”. After his father’s death in 1927, the young Rolihlahla became the ward of Jongintaba Dalindyebo, the Paramount Chief, to be groomed to assume high office. Hearing the elder’s stories of his ancestor’s valour during the wars of resistance, he dreamed also of making his own contribution to the freedom struggle of his people.

After receiving a primary education at a local mission school, where he was given the name Nelson, he was sent to the Clarkebury Boarding Institute for his Junior Certificate and then to Healdtown, a Wesleyan secondary school of some repute, where he matriculated. He then enrolled at the University College of Fort Hare for the Bachelor of Arts Degree where he was elected onto the Students’ Representative Council. He was suspended from college for joining in a protest boycott, along with Oliver Tambo.

He and his cousin Justice ran away to Johannesburg to avoid arranged marriages and for a short period he worked as a mine policeman. Mr Mandela was introduced to Walter Sisulu in 1941 and it was Sisulu who arranged for him to do his articles at Lazar Sidelsky’s law firm. Completing his BA through the University of South Africa (Unisa) in 1942, he commenced study for his LLB shortly afterwards (though he left the University of the Witwatersrand without graduating in 1948). He entered politics in earnest while studying, and joined the African National Congress in 1943.

Despite his increasing political awareness and activities, Mr Mandela also had time for other things. “It was in the lounge of the Sisulu’s home that I met Evelyn Mase … She was a quiet, pretty girl from the countryside who did not seem over-awed by the comings and goings … Within a few months I had asked her to marry me, and she accepted.” They married in a civil ceremony at the Native Commissioner’s Court in Johannesburg, “for we could not afford a traditional wedding or feast”. Mase and Mr Mandela went on to have four children: Thembikile (1946), Makaziwe (1947), who died at nine months, Makgatho (1951) and Makaziwe (1954). The couple was divorced in 1958.

At the height of the Second World War, in 1944, a small group of young Africans who were members of the African National Congress, banded together under the leadership of Anton Lembede. Among them were William Nkomo, Sisulu, Oliver R Tambo, Ashby P Mda and Nelson Mandela. Starting out with 60 members, all of whom were residing around the Witwatersrand, these young people set themselves the formidable task of transforming the ANC into a more radical mass movement.

Their chief contention was that the political tactics of the “old guard” leadership of the ANC, reared in the tradition of constitutionalism and polite petitioning of the government of the day, were proving inadequate to the tasks of national emancipation. In opposition to the old guard, Lembede and his colleagues espoused a radical African nationalism grounded in the principle of national self-determination. In September 1944 they came together to found the African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL).

Mandela soon impressed his peers by his disciplined work and consistent effort and was elected as the league’s National Secretary in 1948. By painstaking work, campaigning at the grass-roots and through its mouthpiece Inyaniso (“Truth”) the ANCYL was able to canvass support for its policies amongst the ANC membership.

[Back to top]

Emerging as Leader

Spurred on by the victory of the National Party which won the 1948 all-white elections on the platform of apartheid, at the 1949 Annual Conference the Programme of Action, inspired by the Youth League, which advocated the weapons of boycott, strike, civil disobedience and non-co-operation, was accepted as official ANC policy.

The Programme of Action had been drawn up by a sub-committee of the ANCYL composed of David Bopape, Mda, Mr Mandela, James Njongwe, Sisulu and Tambo. To ensure its implementation, the membership replaced older leaders with a number of younger men. Sisulu, a founding member of the Youth League, was elected secretary-general. The conservative Dr AB Xuma lost the presidency to Dr JS Moroka, a man with a reputation for greater militancy. In December Mr Mandela himself was elected to the NEC at the National Conference.

When the ANC launched its Campaign for the Defiance of Unjust Laws in 1952, Mr Mandela, by then President of the Youth League, was elected National Volunteer-in-Chief. The Defiance Campaign was conceived as a mass civil disobedience campaign that would snowball from a core of selected volunteers to involve more and more ordinary people, culminating in mass defiance. Fulfilling his responsibility as Volunteer-in-Chief, Mr Mandela travelled the country organising resistance to discriminatory legislation. Charged, with Moroka, Sisulu and 17 others, and brought to trial for his role in the campaign, the court found that Mr Mandela and his co-accused had consistently advised their followers to adopt a peaceful course of action and to avoid all violence.

For his part in the Defiance Campaign, Mr Mandela was convicted of contravening the Suppression of Communism Act and given a suspended prison sentence. Shortly after the campaign ended, he was also prohibited from attending gatherings and confined to Johannesburg for six months.

During this period of restrictions, Mr Mandela wrote the attorneys admission examination and was admitted to the profession. He opened a practice in Johannesburg in August 1952, and in December, in partnership with Tambo, opened South Africa’s first black law firm in central Johannesburg. He says of himself during that time: “As an attorney, I could be rather flamboyant in court. I did not act as though I were a black man in a white man’s court, but as if everyone else – white and black – was a guest in my court. When presenting a case, I often made sweeping gestures and used high-flown language…. (and) used unorthodox tactics with witnesses.”

Their professional status didn’t earn Mr Mandela and Tambo any personal immunity from the brutal apartheid laws. They fell foul of the land segregation legislation, and the authorities demanded that they move their practice from the city to the back of beyond, as Mr Mandela later put it, “miles away from where clients could reach us during working hours. This was tantamount to asking us to abandon our legal practice, to give up the legal service of our people … No attorney worth his salt would easily agree to do that”. The partnership resolved to defy the law.

In 1953 Mr Mandela was given the responsibility to prepare a plan that would enable the leadership of the movement to maintain dynamic contact with its membership without recourse to public meetings. The objective was to prepare for the possibility that the ANC would, like the Communist Party, be declared illegal and to ensure that the organisation would be able to operate from underground. This was the M-Plan, named after him. “The plan was conceived with the best of intentions but it was instituted with only modest success and its adoption was never widespread.”

During the early fifties Mr Mandela played an important part in leading the resistance to the Western Areas removals, and to the introduction of Bantu Education. He also played a significant role in popularising the Freedom Charter, adopted by the Congress of the People in 1955. Having been banned again for two years in 1953, neither Mr Mandela nor Sisulu were able to attend but “we found a place at the edge of the crowd where we could observe without mixing in or being seen”.

During the whole of the ‘50s, Mr Mandela was the victim of various forms of repression. He was banned, arrested and imprisoned. A five year banning order was enforced against him in March 1956. “[But] this time my attitude towards my bans had changed radically. When I was first banned, I abided by the rules and regulations of my persecutors. I had now developed contempt for these restrictions … To allow my activities to be circumscribed my opponent was a form of defeat, and I resolved not to become my own jailer.”

Although Mr Mandela and Mase had effectively separated in 1955, it wasn’t until 1958 that they formally divorced – and shortly afterwards, in June, he was married to Nomzamo Winnie Mandela. Their first date was at an Indian restaurant near Mr Mandela’s office and he recalls that she was “dazzling, and even the fact that she had never before tasted curry and drank glass after glass of water to cool her palate only added to her charm … Winnie has laughingly told people that I never proposed to her, but I always told her that I asked her on our very first date and that I simply took it for granted from that day forward”.

Unlike his first marriage, the couple observed most of the traditional requirements, including payment of lobola, and were married in a local church in Bizana on June 14. There was no time (or money) for a honeymoon – Nelson had to appear in court for the continuing Treason Trial and anyway his banning order had only been relaxed for six days.

[Back to top]

The Trials

In fact for much of the latter half of the decade, he was one of the 156 accused in the mammoth Treason Trial, at great cost to his legal practice and his political work, though he recalls that, during his incarceration in the Fort, the communal cell “became a kind of convention for far-flung freedom fighters”. After the Sharpeville Massacre on March 21. 1960, the ANC was outlawed, and Mr Mandela, still on trial, was detained, along with hundreds of others.

The Treason Trial collapsed in 1961 as South Africa was being steered towards the adoption of the republic constitution. With the ANC now illegal the leadership picked up the threads from its underground headquarters and Nelson Mandela emerged at this time as the leading figure in this new phase of struggle. Under the ANC’s inspiration, 1 400 delegates came together at an All-in African Conference in Pietermaritzburg during March 1961.

Mr Mandela was the keynote speaker. In an electrifying address he challenged the apartheid regime to convene a national convention, representative of all South Africans to thrash out a new constitution based on democratic principles. Failure to comply, he warned, would compel the majority (Blacks) to observe the forthcoming inauguration of the Republic with a mass general strike. He immediately went underground to lead the campaign. Although fewer answered the call than Mr Mandela had hoped, it attracted considerable support throughout the country. The government responded with the largest military mobilisation since the war, and the Republic was born in an atmosphere of fear and apprehension.

Forced to live apart from his family (and he and Winnie by now had two daughters, Zenani born in 1959 and Zindzi, born 1960) moving from place to place to evade detection by the government’s ubiquitous informers and police spies, Mr Mandela had to adopt a number of disguises. Sometimes dressed as a labourer, at other times as a chauffeur, his successful evasion of the police earned him the title of the Black Pimpernel.

He managed to travel around the country and stayed with numerous sympathisers – a family in Market Street central Johannesburg, in his comrade Wolfie Kodesh’s flat (where he insisted on running on-the-spot every day), in the servant’s quarters of a doctor’s house where he pretended to be a gardener, and on a sugar plantation in Natal. It was during this time that he, together with other leaders of the ANC, constituted a new section of the liberation movement, Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK), as an armed nucleus with a view to preparing for armed struggle, with Mr Mandela as its commander in chief.

At the Rivonia Trial, Mr Mandela explained: “At the beginning of June 1961, after long and anxious assessment of the South African situation, I and some colleagues came to the conclusion that as violence in this country was inevitable, it would be wrong and unrealistic for African leaders to continue preaching peace and non-violence at a time when the government met our peaceful demands with force. It was only when all else had failed, when all channels of peaceful protest had been barred to us, that the decision was made to embark on violent forms of political struggle, and to form Umkhonto we Sizwe ... the Government had left us no other choice.”

In 1962 Mandela left the country, as ‘David Motsamayi’, and travelled abroad for several months. In Ethiopia he addressed the Conference of the Pan African Freedom Movement of East and Central Africa, and was warmly received by senior political leaders in several countries including Tanganyika, Senegal, Ghana and Sierra Leone. He also spent time in London where he managed to find time, with Oliver Tambo, to see the sights as well as to spend time with many exiled comrades. During this trip Mr Mandela met up with the first group of 21 MK recruits on their way to Addis Ababa for guerrilla training.

[Back to top]

Prisoner 466/64

Not long after his return to South Africa Mr Mandela was arrested, on August 5, and charged with illegal exit from the country, and incitement to strike. He was in Natal at the time, passing through Howick on his way back to Johannesburg, posing again as David Motsamayi, now the driver of a white theatre director and MK member, Cecil Williams.

Since he considered the prosecution a trial of the aspirations of the African people, Mr Mandela decided to conduct his own defence. He applied for the recusal of the magistrate, on the ground that in such a prosecution a judiciary controlled entirely by whites was an interested party and therefore could not be impartial, and on the ground that he owed no duty to obey the laws of a white parliament, in which he was not represented. Mr Mandela prefaced this challenge with the affirmation: “I detest racialism, because I regard it as a barbaric thing, whether it comes from a black man or a white man.”

Mr Mandela was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment. He was transferred to Robben Island in May 1963 only to be brought back to Pretoria again in July. The authorities issued a statement to the press that this had been done to protect Mr Mandela from assault by PAC prisoners. “This was patently false; they had brought me back to Pretoria for their own motives, which soon became clear.” Not long afterwards he encountered Thomas Mashifane, the foreman from Liliesleaf Farm in Rivonia where MK had set up their HQ. He knew then that their hide-out had been discovered. A few days later he and 10 others were charged with sabotage.

The Rivonia Trial, as it came to be known, lasted eight months. Most of the accused stood up well to the prosecution, having made a collective decision that this was a political trial and that they would take the opportunity to make public their political beliefs. Three of the accused, Mr Mandela, Sisulu and Govan Mbeki also decided that, if they were given the death sentence, they would not appeal.

Mr Mandela’s statement in court during the trial is a classic in the history of the resistance to apartheid, and has been an inspiration to all who have opposed it. He ended with these words:

“I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

All but two of the accused were found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment on June 12, 1964. The black prisoners were flown secretly to Robben Island immediately after the trial was over to begin serving their sentences.

Nelson Mandela’s time in prison, which amounted to just over 27 and a half years’, was marked by many small and large events which played a crucial part in shaping the personality and attitudes of the man who was to become the first President of a democratic South Africa. Many fellow prisoners and warders influenced him and he, in his turn, influenced them. While he was in jail his mother and son died, his wife was banned and subjected to continuous arrest and harassment, and the liberation movement was reduced to isolated groups of activists.

In March 1982, after 18 years, he was suddenly transferred to Pollsmoor Prison in Cape Town (with Sisulu, Raymond Mhlaba and Andrew Mlangeni) and in December 1988 he was moved to the Victor Verster Prison near Paarl, from where he was eventually released. While in prison, Mr Mandela flatly rejected offers made by his jailers for remission of sentence in exchange for accepting the bantustan policy by recognising the independence of the Transkei and agreeing to settle there. Again in the ‘80s Mr Mandela and others rejected an offer of release on condition that he renounce violence. Prisoners cannot enter into contracts – only free men can negotiate, he said.

Nevertheless Mr Mandela did initiate talks with the apartheid regime in 1985, when he wrote to Minister of Justice Kobie Coetsee. They first met later that year when Mr Mandela was hospitalised for prostate surgery. Shortly after this he was moved to a single cell at Pollsmoor and this gave Mr Mandela the chance to start a dialogue with the government – which took the form of ‘talks about talks’. Throughout this process, he was adamant that negotiations could only be carried out by the full ANC leadership. In time, a secret channel of communication would be set up whereby he could get messages to the ANC in Lusaka, but at the beginning he said: “I chose to tell no one what I was about to do. There are times when a leader must move out ahead of the flock, go off in a new direction, confident that he is leading his people in the right direction.”

Released on February 11, 1990, Mr Mandela plunged wholeheartedly into his life’s work, striving to attain the goals he and others had set out almost four decades earlier. In 1991, at the first national conference of the ANC held inside South Africa after being banned for decades, Nelson Mandela was elected President of the ANC while his lifelong friend and colleague, Oliver Tambo, became the organisation’s National Chairperson.

[Back to top]

Negotiating Peace

In a life that symbolises the triumph of the human spirit, Nelson Mandela accepted the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize (along with FW de Klerk) on behalf of all South Africans who suffered and sacrificed so much to bring peace to our land.

The era of apartheid formally came to an end on the April 27, 1994, when Nelson Mandela voted for the first time in his life – along with his people. However, long before that date it had become clear, even before the start of negotiations at the World Trade Centre in Kempton Park, that the ANC was increasingly charting the future of South Africa.

Rolihlahla Nelson Dalibunga Mandela was inaugurated as President of a democratic South Africa on May 10, 1994. In his inauguration speech he said:

“We dedicate this day to all the heroes and heroines in this country and the rest of the world who sacrificed in many ways and surrendered their lives so that we could be free. Their dreams have become reality. Freedom is their reward. We are both humbled and elevated by the honour and privilege that you, the people of South Africa, have bestowed on us, as the first President of a united, democratic, non-racial and non-sexist government.

“We understand it still that there is no easy road to freedom. We know it well that none of us acting alone can achieve success. We must therefore act together as a united people, for national reconciliation, for nation building, for the birth of a new world. Let there be justice for all. Let there be peace for all. Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all. Let each know that for each the body, the mind and the soul have been freed to fulfil themselves. Never, never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world. Let freedom reign.”

Mr Mandela stepped down in 1999 after one term as President – but for him there has been no real retirement. He set up three foundations bearing his name: The Nelson Mandela Foundation, The Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund and The Mandela-Rhodes Foundation. Until very recently his schedule has been relentless. But during this period he has had the love and support of his large family – including his wife Graça Machel, whom he married on his 80th birthday in 1998.

In April 2007 Mandla Mandela, grandson of Nelson and son of Makgatho Mandela who died in 2005, was installed as head of the Mvezo Traditional Council at an ubeko (“anointment”) ceremony at the Mvezo Great Place, the seat of the Madiba clan.

Nelson Mandela never wavered in his devotion to democracy, equality and learning. Despite terrible provocation, he has never answered racism with racism. His life has been an inspiration, in South Africa and throughout the world, to all who are oppressed and deprived, to all who are opposed to oppression and deprivation.

Various pictures of Nelson Mandela

Early Years

Rolihlahla Mandela was born in Mvezo, a village near Mthatha in the Transkei, on July 18, 1918, to Nonqaphi Nosekeni and Henry Mgadla Mandela. His father was the principal councillor to the Acting Paramount Chief of the Thembu. Rolihlahla literally means “pulling the branch of a tree”. After his father’s death in 1927, the young Rolihlahla became the ward of Jongintaba Dalindyebo, the Paramount Chief, to be groomed to assume high office. Hearing the elder’s stories of his ancestor’s valour during the wars of resistance, he dreamed also of making his own contribution to the freedom struggle of his people.

After receiving a primary education at a local mission school, where he was given the name Nelson, he was sent to the Clarkebury Boarding Institute for his Junior Certificate and then to Healdtown, a Wesleyan secondary school of some repute, where he matriculated. He then enrolled at the University College of Fort Hare for the Bachelor of Arts Degree where he was elected onto the Students’ Representative Council. He was suspended from college for joining in a protest boycott, along with Oliver Tambo.

He and his cousin Justice ran away to Johannesburg to avoid arranged marriages and for a short period he worked as a mine policeman. Mr Mandela was introduced to Walter Sisulu in 1941 and it was Sisulu who arranged for him to do his articles at Lazar Sidelsky’s law firm. Completing his BA through the University of South Africa (Unisa) in 1942, he commenced study for his LLB shortly afterwards (though he left the University of the Witwatersrand without graduating in 1948). He entered politics in earnest while studying, and joined the African National Congress in 1943.

Despite his increasing political awareness and activities, Mr Mandela also had time for other things. “It was in the lounge of the Sisulu’s home that I met Evelyn Mase … She was a quiet, pretty girl from the countryside who did not seem over-awed by the comings and goings … Within a few months I had asked her to marry me, and she accepted.” They married in a civil ceremony at the Native Commissioner’s Court in Johannesburg, “for we could not afford a traditional wedding or feast”. Mase and Mr Mandela went on to have four children: Thembikile (1946), Makaziwe (1947), who died at nine months, Makgatho (1951) and Makaziwe (1954). The couple was divorced in 1958.

At the height of the Second World War, in 1944, a small group of young Africans who were members of the African National Congress, banded together under the leadership of Anton Lembede. Among them were William Nkomo, Sisulu, Oliver R Tambo, Ashby P Mda and Nelson Mandela. Starting out with 60 members, all of whom were residing around the Witwatersrand, these young people set themselves the formidable task of transforming the ANC into a more radical mass movement.

Their chief contention was that the political tactics of the “old guard” leadership of the ANC, reared in the tradition of constitutionalism and polite petitioning of the government of the day, were proving inadequate to the tasks of national emancipation. In opposition to the old guard, Lembede and his colleagues espoused a radical African nationalism grounded in the principle of national self-determination. In September 1944 they came together to found the African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL).

Mandela soon impressed his peers by his disciplined work and consistent effort and was elected as the league’s National Secretary in 1948. By painstaking work, campaigning at the grass-roots and through its mouthpiece Inyaniso (“Truth”) the ANCYL was able to canvass support for its policies amongst the ANC membership.

[Back to top]

Emerging as Leader

Spurred on by the victory of the National Party which won the 1948 all-white elections on the platform of apartheid, at the 1949 Annual Conference the Programme of Action, inspired by the Youth League, which advocated the weapons of boycott, strike, civil disobedience and non-co-operation, was accepted as official ANC policy.

The Programme of Action had been drawn up by a sub-committee of the ANCYL composed of David Bopape, Mda, Mr Mandela, James Njongwe, Sisulu and Tambo. To ensure its implementation, the membership replaced older leaders with a number of younger men. Sisulu, a founding member of the Youth League, was elected secretary-general. The conservative Dr AB Xuma lost the presidency to Dr JS Moroka, a man with a reputation for greater militancy. In December Mr Mandela himself was elected to the NEC at the National Conference.

When the ANC launched its Campaign for the Defiance of Unjust Laws in 1952, Mr Mandela, by then President of the Youth League, was elected National Volunteer-in-Chief. The Defiance Campaign was conceived as a mass civil disobedience campaign that would snowball from a core of selected volunteers to involve more and more ordinary people, culminating in mass defiance. Fulfilling his responsibility as Volunteer-in-Chief, Mr Mandela travelled the country organising resistance to discriminatory legislation. Charged, with Moroka, Sisulu and 17 others, and brought to trial for his role in the campaign, the court found that Mr Mandela and his co-accused had consistently advised their followers to adopt a peaceful course of action and to avoid all violence.

For his part in the Defiance Campaign, Mr Mandela was convicted of contravening the Suppression of Communism Act and given a suspended prison sentence. Shortly after the campaign ended, he was also prohibited from attending gatherings and confined to Johannesburg for six months.

During this period of restrictions, Mr Mandela wrote the attorneys admission examination and was admitted to the profession. He opened a practice in Johannesburg in August 1952, and in December, in partnership with Tambo, opened South Africa’s first black law firm in central Johannesburg. He says of himself during that time: “As an attorney, I could be rather flamboyant in court. I did not act as though I were a black man in a white man’s court, but as if everyone else – white and black – was a guest in my court. When presenting a case, I often made sweeping gestures and used high-flown language…. (and) used unorthodox tactics with witnesses.”

Their professional status didn’t earn Mr Mandela and Tambo any personal immunity from the brutal apartheid laws. They fell foul of the land segregation legislation, and the authorities demanded that they move their practice from the city to the back of beyond, as Mr Mandela later put it, “miles away from where clients could reach us during working hours. This was tantamount to asking us to abandon our legal practice, to give up the legal service of our people … No attorney worth his salt would easily agree to do that”. The partnership resolved to defy the law.

In 1953 Mr Mandela was given the responsibility to prepare a plan that would enable the leadership of the movement to maintain dynamic contact with its membership without recourse to public meetings. The objective was to prepare for the possibility that the ANC would, like the Communist Party, be declared illegal and to ensure that the organisation would be able to operate from underground. This was the M-Plan, named after him. “The plan was conceived with the best of intentions but it was instituted with only modest success and its adoption was never widespread.”

During the early fifties Mr Mandela played an important part in leading the resistance to the Western Areas removals, and to the introduction of Bantu Education. He also played a significant role in popularising the Freedom Charter, adopted by the Congress of the People in 1955. Having been banned again for two years in 1953, neither Mr Mandela nor Sisulu were able to attend but “we found a place at the edge of the crowd where we could observe without mixing in or being seen”.

During the whole of the ‘50s, Mr Mandela was the victim of various forms of repression. He was banned, arrested and imprisoned. A five year banning order was enforced against him in March 1956. “[But] this time my attitude towards my bans had changed radically. When I was first banned, I abided by the rules and regulations of my persecutors. I had now developed contempt for these restrictions … To allow my activities to be circumscribed my opponent was a form of defeat, and I resolved not to become my own jailer.”

Although Mr Mandela and Mase had effectively separated in 1955, it wasn’t until 1958 that they formally divorced – and shortly afterwards, in June, he was married to Nomzamo Winnie Mandela. Their first date was at an Indian restaurant near Mr Mandela’s office and he recalls that she was “dazzling, and even the fact that she had never before tasted curry and drank glass after glass of water to cool her palate only added to her charm … Winnie has laughingly told people that I never proposed to her, but I always told her that I asked her on our very first date and that I simply took it for granted from that day forward”.

Unlike his first marriage, the couple observed most of the traditional requirements, including payment of lobola, and were married in a local church in Bizana on June 14. There was no time (or money) for a honeymoon – Nelson had to appear in court for the continuing Treason Trial and anyway his banning order had only been relaxed for six days.

[Back to top]

The Trials

In fact for much of the latter half of the decade, he was one of the 156 accused in the mammoth Treason Trial, at great cost to his legal practice and his political work, though he recalls that, during his incarceration in the Fort, the communal cell “became a kind of convention for far-flung freedom fighters”. After the Sharpeville Massacre on March 21. 1960, the ANC was outlawed, and Mr Mandela, still on trial, was detained, along with hundreds of others.

The Treason Trial collapsed in 1961 as South Africa was being steered towards the adoption of the republic constitution. With the ANC now illegal the leadership picked up the threads from its underground headquarters and Nelson Mandela emerged at this time as the leading figure in this new phase of struggle. Under the ANC’s inspiration, 1 400 delegates came together at an All-in African Conference in Pietermaritzburg during March 1961.

Mr Mandela was the keynote speaker. In an electrifying address he challenged the apartheid regime to convene a national convention, representative of all South Africans to thrash out a new constitution based on democratic principles. Failure to comply, he warned, would compel the majority (Blacks) to observe the forthcoming inauguration of the Republic with a mass general strike. He immediately went underground to lead the campaign. Although fewer answered the call than Mr Mandela had hoped, it attracted considerable support throughout the country. The government responded with the largest military mobilisation since the war, and the Republic was born in an atmosphere of fear and apprehension.

Forced to live apart from his family (and he and Winnie by now had two daughters, Zenani born in 1959 and Zindzi, born 1960) moving from place to place to evade detection by the government’s ubiquitous informers and police spies, Mr Mandela had to adopt a number of disguises. Sometimes dressed as a labourer, at other times as a chauffeur, his successful evasion of the police earned him the title of the Black Pimpernel.

He managed to travel around the country and stayed with numerous sympathisers – a family in Market Street central Johannesburg, in his comrade Wolfie Kodesh’s flat (where he insisted on running on-the-spot every day), in the servant’s quarters of a doctor’s house where he pretended to be a gardener, and on a sugar plantation in Natal. It was during this time that he, together with other leaders of the ANC, constituted a new section of the liberation movement, Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK), as an armed nucleus with a view to preparing for armed struggle, with Mr Mandela as its commander in chief.

At the Rivonia Trial, Mr Mandela explained: “At the beginning of June 1961, after long and anxious assessment of the South African situation, I and some colleagues came to the conclusion that as violence in this country was inevitable, it would be wrong and unrealistic for African leaders to continue preaching peace and non-violence at a time when the government met our peaceful demands with force. It was only when all else had failed, when all channels of peaceful protest had been barred to us, that the decision was made to embark on violent forms of political struggle, and to form Umkhonto we Sizwe ... the Government had left us no other choice.”

In 1962 Mandela left the country, as ‘David Motsamayi’, and travelled abroad for several months. In Ethiopia he addressed the Conference of the Pan African Freedom Movement of East and Central Africa, and was warmly received by senior political leaders in several countries including Tanganyika, Senegal, Ghana and Sierra Leone. He also spent time in London where he managed to find time, with Oliver Tambo, to see the sights as well as to spend time with many exiled comrades. During this trip Mr Mandela met up with the first group of 21 MK recruits on their way to Addis Ababa for guerrilla training.

[Back to top]

Prisoner 466/64

Not long after his return to South Africa Mr Mandela was arrested, on August 5, and charged with illegal exit from the country, and incitement to strike. He was in Natal at the time, passing through Howick on his way back to Johannesburg, posing again as David Motsamayi, now the driver of a white theatre director and MK member, Cecil Williams.

Since he considered the prosecution a trial of the aspirations of the African people, Mr Mandela decided to conduct his own defence. He applied for the recusal of the magistrate, on the ground that in such a prosecution a judiciary controlled entirely by whites was an interested party and therefore could not be impartial, and on the ground that he owed no duty to obey the laws of a white parliament, in which he was not represented. Mr Mandela prefaced this challenge with the affirmation: “I detest racialism, because I regard it as a barbaric thing, whether it comes from a black man or a white man.”

Mr Mandela was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment. He was transferred to Robben Island in May 1963 only to be brought back to Pretoria again in July. The authorities issued a statement to the press that this had been done to protect Mr Mandela from assault by PAC prisoners. “This was patently false; they had brought me back to Pretoria for their own motives, which soon became clear.” Not long afterwards he encountered Thomas Mashifane, the foreman from Liliesleaf Farm in Rivonia where MK had set up their HQ. He knew then that their hide-out had been discovered. A few days later he and 10 others were charged with sabotage.

The Rivonia Trial, as it came to be known, lasted eight months. Most of the accused stood up well to the prosecution, having made a collective decision that this was a political trial and that they would take the opportunity to make public their political beliefs. Three of the accused, Mr Mandela, Sisulu and Govan Mbeki also decided that, if they were given the death sentence, they would not appeal.

Mr Mandela’s statement in court during the trial is a classic in the history of the resistance to apartheid, and has been an inspiration to all who have opposed it. He ended with these words:

“I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

All but two of the accused were found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment on June 12, 1964. The black prisoners were flown secretly to Robben Island immediately after the trial was over to begin serving their sentences.

Nelson Mandela’s time in prison, which amounted to just over 27 and a half years’, was marked by many small and large events which played a crucial part in shaping the personality and attitudes of the man who was to become the first President of a democratic South Africa. Many fellow prisoners and warders influenced him and he, in his turn, influenced them. While he was in jail his mother and son died, his wife was banned and subjected to continuous arrest and harassment, and the liberation movement was reduced to isolated groups of activists.

In March 1982, after 18 years, he was suddenly transferred to Pollsmoor Prison in Cape Town (with Sisulu, Raymond Mhlaba and Andrew Mlangeni) and in December 1988 he was moved to the Victor Verster Prison near Paarl, from where he was eventually released. While in prison, Mr Mandela flatly rejected offers made by his jailers for remission of sentence in exchange for accepting the bantustan policy by recognising the independence of the Transkei and agreeing to settle there. Again in the ‘80s Mr Mandela and others rejected an offer of release on condition that he renounce violence. Prisoners cannot enter into contracts – only free men can negotiate, he said.

Nevertheless Mr Mandela did initiate talks with the apartheid regime in 1985, when he wrote to Minister of Justice Kobie Coetsee. They first met later that year when Mr Mandela was hospitalised for prostate surgery. Shortly after this he was moved to a single cell at Pollsmoor and this gave Mr Mandela the chance to start a dialogue with the government – which took the form of ‘talks about talks’. Throughout this process, he was adamant that negotiations could only be carried out by the full ANC leadership. In time, a secret channel of communication would be set up whereby he could get messages to the ANC in Lusaka, but at the beginning he said: “I chose to tell no one what I was about to do. There are times when a leader must move out ahead of the flock, go off in a new direction, confident that he is leading his people in the right direction.”

Released on February 11, 1990, Mr Mandela plunged wholeheartedly into his life’s work, striving to attain the goals he and others had set out almost four decades earlier. In 1991, at the first national conference of the ANC held inside South Africa after being banned for decades, Nelson Mandela was elected President of the ANC while his lifelong friend and colleague, Oliver Tambo, became the organisation’s National Chairperson.

[Back to top]

Negotiating Peace

In a life that symbolises the triumph of the human spirit, Nelson Mandela accepted the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize (along with FW de Klerk) on behalf of all South Africans who suffered and sacrificed so much to bring peace to our land.

The era of apartheid formally came to an end on the April 27, 1994, when Nelson Mandela voted for the first time in his life – along with his people. However, long before that date it had become clear, even before the start of negotiations at the World Trade Centre in Kempton Park, that the ANC was increasingly charting the future of South Africa.

Rolihlahla Nelson Dalibunga Mandela was inaugurated as President of a democratic South Africa on May 10, 1994. In his inauguration speech he said:

“We dedicate this day to all the heroes and heroines in this country and the rest of the world who sacrificed in many ways and surrendered their lives so that we could be free. Their dreams have become reality. Freedom is their reward. We are both humbled and elevated by the honour and privilege that you, the people of South Africa, have bestowed on us, as the first President of a united, democratic, non-racial and non-sexist government.

“We understand it still that there is no easy road to freedom. We know it well that none of us acting alone can achieve success. We must therefore act together as a united people, for national reconciliation, for nation building, for the birth of a new world. Let there be justice for all. Let there be peace for all. Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all. Let each know that for each the body, the mind and the soul have been freed to fulfil themselves. Never, never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world. Let freedom reign.”

Mr Mandela stepped down in 1999 after one term as President – but for him there has been no real retirement. He set up three foundations bearing his name: The Nelson Mandela Foundation, The Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund and The Mandela-Rhodes Foundation. Until very recently his schedule has been relentless. But during this period he has had the love and support of his large family – including his wife Graça Machel, whom he married on his 80th birthday in 1998.

In April 2007 Mandla Mandela, grandson of Nelson and son of Makgatho Mandela who died in 2005, was installed as head of the Mvezo Traditional Council at an ubeko (“anointment”) ceremony at the Mvezo Great Place, the seat of the Madiba clan.

Nelson Mandela never wavered in his devotion to democracy, equality and learning. Despite terrible provocation, he has never answered racism with racism. His life has been an inspiration, in South Africa and throughout the world, to all who are oppressed and deprived, to all who are opposed to oppression and deprivation.

Grandes frases de Mandela

Después de escalar una gran colina, uno se encuentra sólo con que hay muchas más colinas que escalar.
Nelson Mandela

La educación es el arma más poderosa que puedes usar para cambiar el mundo.
Nelson Mandela

Porque ser libre no es solamente desamarrarse las propias cadenas, sino vivir en una forma que respete y mejore la libertad de los demás.
Nelson Mandela

Detesto el racismo, porque lo veo como algo barbárico, ya sea que venga de un hombre negro o un hombre blanco.
Nelson Mandela

Aprendí que el coraje no era la ausencia de miedo, sino el triunfo sobre él. El valiente no es quien no siente miedo, sino aquel que conquista ese miedo.
Nelson Mandela

Si quieres hacer las paces con tu enemigo, tienes que trabajar con tu enemigo. Entonces él se vuelve tu compañero.
Nelson Mandela

Deja que la libertad reine. El sol nunca se pone sobre tan glorioso logro humano.
Nelson Mandela

Nunca, nunca y nunca otra vez, debería ocurrir que esta tierra hermosa experimente la opresión de una persona por otra.
Nelson Mandela

No puede haber una revelación más intensa del alma de una sociedad que la forma en la que trata a sus niños.
Nelson Mandela

© Copyright 2007-2010 Qfrases - Política de privacidad - Acerca de

Después de escalar una gran colina, uno se encuentra sólo con que hay muchas más colinas que escalar.
Nelson Mandela

La educación es el arma más poderosa que puedes usar para cambiar el mundo.
Nelson Mandela

Porque ser libre no es solamente desamarrarse las propias cadenas, sino vivir en una forma que respete y mejore la libertad de los demás.
Nelson Mandela

Detesto el racismo, porque lo veo como algo barbárico, ya sea que venga de un hombre negro o un hombre blanco.
Nelson Mandela

Aprendí que el coraje no era la ausencia de miedo, sino el triunfo sobre él. El valiente no es quien no siente miedo, sino aquel que conquista ese miedo.
Nelson Mandela

Si quieres hacer las paces con tu enemigo, tienes que trabajar con tu enemigo. Entonces él se vuelve tu compañero.
Nelson Mandela

Deja que la libertad reine. El sol nunca se pone sobre tan glorioso logro humano.
Nelson Mandela

Nunca, nunca y nunca otra vez, debería ocurrir que esta tierra hermosa experimente la opresión de una persona por otra.
Nelson Mandela

No puede haber una revelación más intensa del alma de una sociedad que la forma en la que trata a sus niños.
Nelson Mandela

© Copyright 2007-2010 Qfrases - Política de privacidad - Acerca de

Películas: 'Adiós Bafana'

Adiós Bafana

De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
Saltar a: navegación, búsqueda

Adiós Bafana es una película dirigida por Bille August basada en un hecho real en relación al líder sudafricano Nelson Mandela.

Goodbye Bafana
Título Adiós Bafana
Ficha técnica
Dirección Bille August
Producción Jean-Luc van Damm
Ilann Girard
Andro Steinborn
Guion Greg Latter
Bille August
Fotografía Robert Fraisse
Protagonistas Joseph Fiennes
Dennis Haysbert
Diane Kruger
Faith Ndukwana
Terry Pheto
Lesley Mongezi
Zingi Mtuluza
Ver todos los créditos (IMDb)
Datos y cifras
País(es) Alemania
Reino Unido
Sudáfrica
Francia
Año 2007
Duración 140 minutos
Compañías
Distribución UIP
Ficha en IMDb

Contenido

Argumento

James Gregory (Joseph Fiennes) es un suboficial de gendarmería de prisiones en Sudáfrica, casado con Gloria (Diane Kruger), una hermosa mujer, y tiene dos hijos adolescentes en edad escolar.

James Gregory es asignado a una prisión de máxima seguridad de Robben Island donde están confinados varios prisioneros políticos, entre los que se encuentra Nelson Mandela (Dennis Haysbert), encarcelado durante la época del apartheid. Gregory no fue asignado al azar por el alto mando de prisiones, sino por su perfecto dominio del idioma nativo local y su celo al deber. Al llegar con su esposa, Gregory asiste a reuniones sociales que son reservadas para oficiales, lo que es poco común.

Es asignado como oficial de censura de la prisión y su principal función es averiguar todo lo posible e informar a la superioridad de Nelson Mandela y sus compañeros de celda, todos líderes del movimiento de libertad que pregona el líder y en especial aplicar con todo el rigor posible las duras restricciones carcelarias impuestas a Mandela y su grupo. Todo bajo la supervisión constante del alcaide.

LLega la esposa de Mandela a visitar a su marido en prisión, derecho que solo puede tomar cada 6 meses y solo tener una conversación en idioma inglés y por máximo de 10 minutos. Al llegar su marido, ellos hablan en idioma local (ignorando que Gregory lo domina) y este cancela la visita por romper las reglas.

James Gregory considera en un comienzo y en cierto modo que Mandela y sus acólitos son terroristas sin piedad, pero cuando logra conocer la llamada "Carta de Libertad" que Mandela había publicado, sus ideas pro-apartheid empiezan lentamente a revertirse. Esto lo mantiene en secreto.

Cuando era niño, Gregory aprendió el idioma local y una forma de lucha con palos de un amigo negro llamado Bafana, él al darle el adiós le dio un amuleto a Gregory quien lo conservó siempre.

Esta actitud pro-Mandela adquirida por su esposo es reprochada por su esposa ya que esto le podría costar su carrera o su ascenso de teniente ya sea por políticas internas de gendarmería y por que el gobierno de turno es contrario a darle derechos a la gente de raza negra. Además se ha considerado asesinar a Mandela, pero el hecho de convertirlo en un mártir desataría la guerra civil.

Lo que no sospecha el suboficial Gregory es que está siendo controlado y manejado astutamente por personajes políticos del gobierno central y la inteligencia gubernamental, como un instrumento de relaciones públicas, ya que la situación interna de Sudáfrica corre el peligro de desbordarse en una sangrienta guerra civil y racista. Como oficial de censura, Gregory descubre un mensaje en una postal que implica a cierto líder negro del grupo de Mandela a punto de ser libertado, el mensaje dice que se reunirá con grupos activistas. Gregory informa a sus superiores del contenido de este mensaje lo que se traduce en el asesinato político de este secundario líder negro. El asesinato del líder negro se traduce en atentados con coches bomba y gran cantidad de muertes.

Pasa el tiempo y Gregory a pesar de las dificultades ve que su situación económica va en progreso, es ascendido a jefe de seguridad de Mandela, además de la labor de censura; pero su esposa sufre con la cada vez más cercanía de su marido con el afamado líder negro. Gregory realiza todas las gestiones posibles para impedir que el líder esté expuesto a ser asesinado.

Gregory empieza a conocer más a Mandela y termina por admirarle y brindarle ciertos favores no permitidos, por lo que es amonestado duramente y tratado como un pro-mandelista, lo que le trae conflictos con su esposa, sus vecinos y además es agredido físicamente.

Finalmente, a pesar de las solicitudes denegadas de traslado y finalmente su dimisión, Gregory empieza a vislumbrar por qué está a cargo de Mandela. El gobierno sudafricano termina su mandato y asciende otro más proclive al pacifismo.

El hijo varón de Gregory muere en un accidente automovilístico justo al momento de graduarse lo que sume en el dolor al matrimonio. Gregory por un momento sospecha de venganza política pero sus dudas son aclaradas.

Finalmente y bajo el consentimiento del nuevo gobierno sudafricano, Gregory y Mandela alternan sin restricciones carcelarias, el trabajo de Gregory es "ablandar" la posición de lucha armada que mantienen los seguidores del líder negro y finalmente lo consigue.

Finalmente Mandela es liberado después de 27 años de prisión y el suboficial Gregory recibe sus despachos de teniente y el líder negro es elegido democráticamente como Presidente.

Comentarios

Basado en las Memorias de Nelson Mandela durante su estancia en la cárcel, escrito por Bob Graham.

Controversia

La autobiografía en la cual se basa la película, "Goodbye Bafana: Nelson Mandela, My Prisoner, My Friend", fue cuestionada por Anthony Sampson, amigo de Mandela. En el libro "Mandela: the Authorised Biography", Sampson acusa a James Gregory, quien murió de cáncer en 2003, de mentir y violar la privacidad de Mandela en su libro "Goodbye Bafana". Sampson dijo que Gregory raramente habló con Mandela, sino que censuró las cartas enviadas al prisionero y usó esa información para fabricar una relación cercana con él.[1]

Referencias

  1. Mandela: The Authorised Biography, p.217.

Adiós Bafana

De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
Saltar a: navegación, búsqueda

Adiós Bafana es una película dirigida por Bille August basada en un hecho real en relación al líder sudafricano Nelson Mandela.

Goodbye Bafana
Título Adiós Bafana
Ficha técnica
Dirección Bille August
Producción Jean-Luc van Damm
Ilann Girard
Andro Steinborn
Guion Greg Latter
Bille August
Fotografía Robert Fraisse
Protagonistas Joseph Fiennes
Dennis Haysbert
Diane Kruger
Faith Ndukwana
Terry Pheto
Lesley Mongezi
Zingi Mtuluza
Ver todos los créditos (IMDb)
Datos y cifras
País(es) Alemania
Reino Unido
Sudáfrica
Francia
Año 2007
Duración 140 minutos
Compañías
Distribución UIP
Ficha en IMDb

Contenido

Argumento

James Gregory (Joseph Fiennes) es un suboficial de gendarmería de prisiones en Sudáfrica, casado con Gloria (Diane Kruger), una hermosa mujer, y tiene dos hijos adolescentes en edad escolar.

James Gregory es asignado a una prisión de máxima seguridad de Robben Island donde están confinados varios prisioneros políticos, entre los que se encuentra Nelson Mandela (Dennis Haysbert), encarcelado durante la época del apartheid. Gregory no fue asignado al azar por el alto mando de prisiones, sino por su perfecto dominio del idioma nativo local y su celo al deber. Al llegar con su esposa, Gregory asiste a reuniones sociales que son reservadas para oficiales, lo que es poco común.

Es asignado como oficial de censura de la prisión y su principal función es averiguar todo lo posible e informar a la superioridad de Nelson Mandela y sus compañeros de celda, todos líderes del movimiento de libertad que pregona el líder y en especial aplicar con todo el rigor posible las duras restricciones carcelarias impuestas a Mandela y su grupo. Todo bajo la supervisión constante del alcaide.

LLega la esposa de Mandela a visitar a su marido en prisión, derecho que solo puede tomar cada 6 meses y solo tener una conversación en idioma inglés y por máximo de 10 minutos. Al llegar su marido, ellos hablan en idioma local (ignorando que Gregory lo domina) y este cancela la visita por romper las reglas.

James Gregory considera en un comienzo y en cierto modo que Mandela y sus acólitos son terroristas sin piedad, pero cuando logra conocer la llamada "Carta de Libertad" que Mandela había publicado, sus ideas pro-apartheid empiezan lentamente a revertirse. Esto lo mantiene en secreto.

Cuando era niño, Gregory aprendió el idioma local y una forma de lucha con palos de un amigo negro llamado Bafana, él al darle el adiós le dio un amuleto a Gregory quien lo conservó siempre.

Esta actitud pro-Mandela adquirida por su esposo es reprochada por su esposa ya que esto le podría costar su carrera o su ascenso de teniente ya sea por políticas internas de gendarmería y por que el gobierno de turno es contrario a darle derechos a la gente de raza negra. Además se ha considerado asesinar a Mandela, pero el hecho de convertirlo en un mártir desataría la guerra civil.

Lo que no sospecha el suboficial Gregory es que está siendo controlado y manejado astutamente por personajes políticos del gobierno central y la inteligencia gubernamental, como un instrumento de relaciones públicas, ya que la situación interna de Sudáfrica corre el peligro de desbordarse en una sangrienta guerra civil y racista. Como oficial de censura, Gregory descubre un mensaje en una postal que implica a cierto líder negro del grupo de Mandela a punto de ser libertado, el mensaje dice que se reunirá con grupos activistas. Gregory informa a sus superiores del contenido de este mensaje lo que se traduce en el asesinato político de este secundario líder negro. El asesinato del líder negro se traduce en atentados con coches bomba y gran cantidad de muertes.

Pasa el tiempo y Gregory a pesar de las dificultades ve que su situación económica va en progreso, es ascendido a jefe de seguridad de Mandela, además de la labor de censura; pero su esposa sufre con la cada vez más cercanía de su marido con el afamado líder negro. Gregory realiza todas las gestiones posibles para impedir que el líder esté expuesto a ser asesinado.

Gregory empieza a conocer más a Mandela y termina por admirarle y brindarle ciertos favores no permitidos, por lo que es amonestado duramente y tratado como un pro-mandelista, lo que le trae conflictos con su esposa, sus vecinos y además es agredido físicamente.

Finalmente, a pesar de las solicitudes denegadas de traslado y finalmente su dimisión, Gregory empieza a vislumbrar por qué está a cargo de Mandela. El gobierno sudafricano termina su mandato y asciende otro más proclive al pacifismo.

El hijo varón de Gregory muere en un accidente automovilístico justo al momento de graduarse lo que sume en el dolor al matrimonio. Gregory por un momento sospecha de venganza política pero sus dudas son aclaradas.

Finalmente y bajo el consentimiento del nuevo gobierno sudafricano, Gregory y Mandela alternan sin restricciones carcelarias, el trabajo de Gregory es "ablandar" la posición de lucha armada que mantienen los seguidores del líder negro y finalmente lo consigue.

Finalmente Mandela es liberado después de 27 años de prisión y el suboficial Gregory recibe sus despachos de teniente y el líder negro es elegido democráticamente como Presidente.

Comentarios

Basado en las Memorias de Nelson Mandela durante su estancia en la cárcel, escrito por Bob Graham.

Controversia

La autobiografía en la cual se basa la película, "Goodbye Bafana: Nelson Mandela, My Prisoner, My Friend", fue cuestionada por Anthony Sampson, amigo de Mandela. En el libro "Mandela: the Authorised Biography", Sampson acusa a James Gregory, quien murió de cáncer en 2003, de mentir y violar la privacidad de Mandela en su libro "Goodbye Bafana". Sampson dijo que Gregory raramente habló con Mandela, sino que censuró las cartas enviadas al prisionero y usó esa información para fabricar una relación cercana con él.[1]

Referencias

  1. Mandela: The Authorised Biography, p.217.

Películas: 'Invictus'

Invictus (película)

De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
Saltar a: navegación, búsqueda
Para otros usos de este término, véase Invictus (desambiguación).
Invictus
Título Invictus
Ficha técnica
Dirección Clint Eastwood
Producción Clint Eastwood
Lori McCreary
Robert Lorenz
Mace Neufeld
Morgan Freeman
Guion Anthony Peckham
Libro:
John Carlin
Música Kyle Eastwood
Michael Stevens
Fotografía Tom Stern
Montaje Joel Cox, Gary D. Roach
Protagonistas Morgan Freeman
Matt Damon
Ver todos los créditos (IMDb)
Datos y cifras
País(es) Estados Unidos
Año 2009
Género Drama
Duración 134 minutos
Compañías
Productora Spyglass Entertainment, Revelations Entertainment, Malpaso Productions,
Distribución Warner Bros. Pictures
Presupuesto $50.000.000[1]
Recaudación $122.056.899
(en todo el mundo)[2]
Ficha en IMDb
Ficha en FilmAffinity

Invictus es un película de drama deportivo del año 2009, dirigido por Clint Eastwood y protagonizada por Morgan Freeman y Matt Damon. La historia está basada en el libro de John Carlin, Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game That Changed a Nation. La película trata sobre los acontecimientos en Sudáfrica antes y durante la Copa Mundial de Rugby de 1995, organizado en ese país tras el desmantelamiento del sistema segregacionista del apartheid. Freeman y Damon desempeñar, respectivamente, el presidente sudafricano Nelson Mandela y Francois Pienaar, el capitán de los Springboks. Invictus fue lanzado en los Estados Unidos el 11 de diciembre de 2009. El nombre Invictus, puede ser traducido del latín como invicto o invencible, y es el título de un poema del inglés William Ernest Henley (1849-1903).

Contenido

Argumento

La película cuenta los primeros años vividos en Sudáfrica tras la abolición del sistema segregacionista del apartheid. Tras ser liberado de prisión en 1990, el líder activista Nelson Mandela logra llegar años después a la presidencia de Sudáfrica, y desde ese puesto se dispone a construir una política de reconciliación entre la mayoría negra, que fue oprimida en el Apartheid, y la minoría blanca, que se muestra temerosa de un posible revanchismo por parte del nuevo gobierno.

Para tal fin, Mandela fija su atención en la selección sudafricana de rugby, conocida como "Springboks". Este equipo no pasa por una buena racha deportiva y sus fracasos se acumulan; además, no cuenta con el apoyo de la población negra, que lo identifica con las instituciones del apartheid. Mandela convoca al capitán del equipo, François Pienaar, y juntos se empeñan en una cruzada para conseguir la unidad de Sudáfrica. Para ello deciden que es necesario ganar la Copa Mundial de Rugby de 1995 que se disputa en Sudáfrica, cuya final tendrá lugar en el Estadio Ellis Park de Johannesburgo.


Misceláneas

  • La película está basada en el libro Playing The Enemy: Nelson Mandela y The Game that Made a Nation, que fue escrito por el inglés John Carlin. Los realizadores se reunieron con Carlin durante una semana en su casa de Barcelona, discutiendo la manera de transformar el libro en un guion. El rodaje comenzó en marzo de 2009 en Ciudad del Cabo.
  • Morgan Freeman fue el actor que hizo el papel de Mandela mientras que Matt Damon fue elegido para el papel de François Pienaar. Damon recibió un entrenamiento intensivo a cargo de Chester Williams, quien en la vida real fue uno de los jugadores del equipo sudafricano en 1995; este entrenamiento se llevó a cabo en el Gardens Rugby Club. Damon también se entrevistó con el auténtico Pienaar.
  • "En términos de categoría y estrellas de cine, ésta es sin duda una de las más grandes películas de la historia que se han hecho en Sudáfrica", dijo Laurence Mitchell, jefe de la Comisión de Cine de El Cabo.
  • Scott Eastwood, quien interpreta al jugador Joel Stransky (cuya anotación casi al término del juego permite la victoria de los Springboks en la final de 1995), es hijo del director Clint Eastwood.
  • Varias audiciones tuvieron lugar entre la navidad de 2008 y marzo de 2009 para tratar de encontrar un actor británico conocido que interpretara al padre de Pienaar, pero en marzo, se decidió elegir un actor sudafricano poco conocido.
  • El jugador de Nueva Zelanda, Jonah Lomu, fue interpretado por Zak Feaunati, quien fue jugador del equipo Bath Rugby y que actualmente es el jefe de rugby en el colegio Vesey's Grammar en Sutton Coldfield. . .

Nominaciones

Premios Oscar

Año Categoría Candidato Resultado
2009 Mejor Actor Morgan Freeman Candidato
2009 Mejor Actor de Reparto Matt Damon Candidato

Sindicato de Actores

Año Categoría Candidato Resultado
2009 Mejor Actor Morgan Freeman Candidato
2009 Mejor Actor de Reparto Matt Damon Candidato

Globo de Oro

Año Categoría Película Resultado
2009 Mejor Director Clint Eastwood Candidato
2009 Mejor Actor - Drama Morgan Freeman Candidato
2009 Mejor Actor de Reparto Matt Damon Candidato

Reparto

Referencias

Enlaces externos

Invictus (película)

De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
Saltar a: navegación, búsqueda
Para otros usos de este término, véase Invictus (desambiguación).
Invictus
Título Invictus
Ficha técnica
Dirección Clint Eastwood
Producción Clint Eastwood
Lori McCreary
Robert Lorenz
Mace Neufeld
Morgan Freeman
Guion Anthony Peckham
Libro:
John Carlin
Música Kyle Eastwood
Michael Stevens
Fotografía Tom Stern
Montaje Joel Cox, Gary D. Roach
Protagonistas Morgan Freeman
Matt Damon
Ver todos los créditos (IMDb)
Datos y cifras
País(es) Estados Unidos
Año 2009
Género Drama
Duración 134 minutos
Compañías
Productora Spyglass Entertainment, Revelations Entertainment, Malpaso Productions,
Distribución Warner Bros. Pictures
Presupuesto $50.000.000[1]
Recaudación $122.056.899
(en todo el mundo)[2]
Ficha en IMDb
Ficha en FilmAffinity

Invictus es un película de drama deportivo del año 2009, dirigido por Clint Eastwood y protagonizada por Morgan Freeman y Matt Damon. La historia está basada en el libro de John Carlin, Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game That Changed a Nation. La película trata sobre los acontecimientos en Sudáfrica antes y durante la Copa Mundial de Rugby de 1995, organizado en ese país tras el desmantelamiento del sistema segregacionista del apartheid. Freeman y Damon desempeñar, respectivamente, el presidente sudafricano Nelson Mandela y Francois Pienaar, el capitán de los Springboks. Invictus fue lanzado en los Estados Unidos el 11 de diciembre de 2009. El nombre Invictus, puede ser traducido del latín como invicto o invencible, y es el título de un poema del inglés William Ernest Henley (1849-1903).

Contenido

Argumento

La película cuenta los primeros años vividos en Sudáfrica tras la abolición del sistema segregacionista del apartheid. Tras ser liberado de prisión en 1990, el líder activista Nelson Mandela logra llegar años después a la presidencia de Sudáfrica, y desde ese puesto se dispone a construir una política de reconciliación entre la mayoría negra, que fue oprimida en el Apartheid, y la minoría blanca, que se muestra temerosa de un posible revanchismo por parte del nuevo gobierno.

Para tal fin, Mandela fija su atención en la selección sudafricana de rugby, conocida como "Springboks". Este equipo no pasa por una buena racha deportiva y sus fracasos se acumulan; además, no cuenta con el apoyo de la población negra, que lo identifica con las instituciones del apartheid. Mandela convoca al capitán del equipo, François Pienaar, y juntos se empeñan en una cruzada para conseguir la unidad de Sudáfrica. Para ello deciden que es necesario ganar la Copa Mundial de Rugby de 1995 que se disputa en Sudáfrica, cuya final tendrá lugar en el Estadio Ellis Park de Johannesburgo.


Misceláneas

  • La película está basada en el libro Playing The Enemy: Nelson Mandela y The Game that Made a Nation, que fue escrito por el inglés John Carlin. Los realizadores se reunieron con Carlin durante una semana en su casa de Barcelona, discutiendo la manera de transformar el libro en un guion. El rodaje comenzó en marzo de 2009 en Ciudad del Cabo.
  • Morgan Freeman fue el actor que hizo el papel de Mandela mientras que Matt Damon fue elegido para el papel de François Pienaar. Damon recibió un entrenamiento intensivo a cargo de Chester Williams, quien en la vida real fue uno de los jugadores del equipo sudafricano en 1995; este entrenamiento se llevó a cabo en el Gardens Rugby Club. Damon también se entrevistó con el auténtico Pienaar.
  • "En términos de categoría y estrellas de cine, ésta es sin duda una de las más grandes películas de la historia que se han hecho en Sudáfrica", dijo Laurence Mitchell, jefe de la Comisión de Cine de El Cabo.
  • Scott Eastwood, quien interpreta al jugador Joel Stransky (cuya anotación casi al término del juego permite la victoria de los Springboks en la final de 1995), es hijo del director Clint Eastwood.
  • Varias audiciones tuvieron lugar entre la navidad de 2008 y marzo de 2009 para tratar de encontrar un actor británico conocido que interpretara al padre de Pienaar, pero en marzo, se decidió elegir un actor sudafricano poco conocido.
  • El jugador de Nueva Zelanda, Jonah Lomu, fue interpretado por Zak Feaunati, quien fue jugador del equipo Bath Rugby y que actualmente es el jefe de rugby en el colegio Vesey's Grammar en Sutton Coldfield. . .

Nominaciones

Premios Oscar

Año Categoría Candidato Resultado
2009 Mejor Actor Morgan Freeman Candidato
2009 Mejor Actor de Reparto Matt Damon Candidato

Sindicato de Actores

Año Categoría Candidato Resultado
2009 Mejor Actor Morgan Freeman Candidato
2009 Mejor Actor de Reparto Matt Damon Candidato

Globo de Oro

Año Categoría Película Resultado
2009 Mejor Director Clint Eastwood Candidato
2009 Mejor Actor - Drama Morgan Freeman Candidato
2009 Mejor Actor de Reparto Matt Damon Candidato

Reparto

Referencias

Enlaces externos

Fundación Nelson Mandela

About the Centre of Memory

The Nelson Mandela Foundation was established after Mr Nelson Mandela’s retirement on August 19, 1999 and leads the development of a living legacy that captures the vision and values of Mr Mandela’s life and work.

Through the creation of strategic networks and partnerships, the Nelson Mandela Foundation directs resources, knowledge and practice to add value and demonstrate new possibilities.

The Nelson Mandela Foundation embodies the spirit of reconciliation, ubuntu, and social justice. Our work is a celebration of Mr Mandela’s life.

Read more

Foundation News

Former President Nelson Mandela goes home

26 February, 2012 – Former President Nelson Mandela has been discharged from hospital following his admission yesterday, Saturday 25 February.

Former President Mandela doing well

26 February, 2012 – Former President Nelson Mandela had a good night’s rest and is making good progress in hospital since his admission yesterday, on Saturday 25 February.

“He is surrounded by his family and is relaxed and comfortable. The doctors are happy with the progress he is making. We thank all South Africans for their love and support of Madiba. We also thank all for affording Madiba and his family privacy and dignity,’’ said President Jacob Zuma.

Former President Mandela in a satisfactory condition

25 February, 2012 – President Jacob Zuma wishes to advise that former President Nelson Mandela is in a satisfactory condition in hospital and is comfortable.

The former president was admitted to hospital this morning, 25 February 2012, for a planned procedure to investigate the causes for a long-standing abdominal complaint.

See more Organisation news

About the Centre of Memory

The Nelson Mandela Foundation was established after Mr Nelson Mandela’s retirement on August 19, 1999 and leads the development of a living legacy that captures the vision and values of Mr Mandela’s life and work.

Through the creation of strategic networks and partnerships, the Nelson Mandela Foundation directs resources, knowledge and practice to add value and demonstrate new possibilities.

The Nelson Mandela Foundation embodies the spirit of reconciliation, ubuntu, and social justice. Our work is a celebration of Mr Mandela’s life.

Read more

Foundation News

Former President Nelson Mandela goes home

26 February, 2012 – Former President Nelson Mandela has been discharged from hospital following his admission yesterday, Saturday 25 February.

Former President Mandela doing well

26 February, 2012 – Former President Nelson Mandela had a good night’s rest and is making good progress in hospital since his admission yesterday, on Saturday 25 February.

“He is surrounded by his family and is relaxed and comfortable. The doctors are happy with the progress he is making. We thank all South Africans for their love and support of Madiba. We also thank all for affording Madiba and his family privacy and dignity,’’ said President Jacob Zuma.

Former President Mandela in a satisfactory condition

25 February, 2012 – President Jacob Zuma wishes to advise that former President Nelson Mandela is in a satisfactory condition in hospital and is comfortable.

The former president was admitted to hospital this morning, 25 February 2012, for a planned procedure to investigate the causes for a long-standing abdominal complaint.

See more Organisation news

Bibliografía

Nelson Mandela

De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
Saltar a: navegación, búsqueda
Para otros usos de este término, véase Mandela (Italia).
Nelson Mandela Premio Nobel de paz
Nelson Mandela
10 de mayo de 1994 – 14 de junio de 1999
Vicepresidente   Frederik Willem de Klerk
Thabo Mbeki
Predecesor Frederik Willem de Klerk (presidente del Estado de Sudáfrica)
Sucesor Thabo Mbeki
Datos personales
Nacimiento 18 de julio de 1918 (93 años)
Bandera de Sudáfrica Mvezo, El Cabo, Unión de Sudáfrica
Partido Congreso Nacional Africano
Profesión Abogado
Religión Metodista
Firma Firma de Nelson Mandela
Sitio web Mandela Foundation

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (IPA: [roli'ɬaɬa]) (Mvezo, Unión de Sudáfrica, 18 de julio de 1918), conocido en su país, Sudáfrica, como Madiba, (título honorífico otorgado por los ancianos del clan de Mandela; también era llamado Tata); abogado y político, fue el primer presidente de Sudáfrica elegido democráticamente mediante sufragio universal así como el líder del Umkhonto we Sizwe, el brazo armado del Congreso Nacional Africano (CNA).

En 1962 fue arrestado y condenado por sabotaje, además de otros cargos, a cadena perpetua. Estuvo 27 años en la cárcel, la mayoría de los cuales estuvo confinado en la prisión de Robben Island. Tras su liberación el 11 de febrero de 1990, Mandela lideró a su partido en las negociaciones para conseguir una democracia multirracial en Sudáfrica, cosa que se consiguió en 1994 con las primeras elecciones democráticas por sufragio universal. Mandela ganó las elecciones y fue presidente desde 1994 hasta 1999, dando frecuentemente prioridad a su reconciliación.

Recibió más de 250 premios y reconocimientos internacionales durante cuatro décadas, incluido en 1993 el Premio Nobel de la Paz.

Contenido

[editar] Vida de Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela nació el 18 de julio de 1918 en Mvezo, un poblado de 300 habitantes cerca de Umtata en el Transkei. Pertenecía al clan Madiba de la etnia xhosa, fue uno de los 13 hijos, que tuvo su padre Gadla Henry Mphakanyiswa o (también llamado Henry Mgadla Mandela), con sus cuatro esposas por un consejero principal de la casa real Thembu; a su vez era nieto de rey (Ngubengcuka, que falleció en el año 1832); su madre era Nonqaphi Nosekeni Fanny tercera de las esposas de Gadla Henry Mphakanyiswa.[1]

Mandela en 1937.

Después de finalizar la secundaria, comenzó a estudiar en el Colegio Universitario de Fort Hare para obtener su título de Bachiller en Artes. Allí fue elegido como miembro del Consejo de Representantes Estudiantiles, fue expulsado junto con un compañero, por participar en una huelga estudiantil. Se trasladó a Johannesburgo, donde en 1941 completó sus estudios de bachillerato por correspondencia en la Unisa. Luego estudió derecho en la Universidad de Wiswatersrand, donde se graduó, en 1942, como abogado.[2]

Se casó tres veces, teniendo 6 hijos. De su primera esposa Evelyn Ntoko Mase, fallecida en julio de 2003 de neumonía,[3] se divorció en 1957 después de 14 años de matrimonio. Una hija de este matrimonio murió en edad de lactancia. Su primer hijo Madiba Thembekili falleció en 1969 en un accidente automovilístico. El 6 de enero de 2005 murió el segundo hijo de Mandela y de su primera esposa, Makgatho Mandela, a la edad de 54 años en Johannesburgo a raíz de una enfermedad asociada al sida, era abogado y hombre de negocios, casado dos veces y padre de 4 hijos.

Después de 38 años de matrimonio con Winnie Madikizela (Winnie Mandela), se separó a causa de escándalos políticos en abril de 1992 y finalmente se divorció el 19 de marzo de 1996. Con Winnie tuvo dos hijas, Zenani (Zeni), nacida el 4 de febrero de 1958, y Zindziswa (Zindzi), nacida en 1960.

En su 80º cumpleaños, el 18 de julio de 1998, contrajo matrimonio con Graça Machel, la viuda de Samora Machel, el antiguo presidente de Mozambique y patrocinador del ANC, fallecido en 1986 en un accidente de avión.

Mandela es un apasionado de la música clásica de Georg Friedrich Händel o Piotr Ilich Tchaikovsky, que acostumbra escuchar disfrutando de los atardeceres.

[editar] Actividad política

Después de la creación del Partido Nacional Sudafricano en 1948, con su política de segregación racial, (el apartheid), Mandela cobra importancia dentro del Congreso Nacional Africano, especialmente en la Campaña de desobediencia civil de 1952, y el Congreso del Pueblo de 1955, en el que la adopción de la "Carta de la Libertad" provee el programa principal en la causa contra el apartheid.

Durante esta época, Mandela y el abogado Oliver Tambo dirigen un despacho de abogados que proporciona consejo legal de bajo costo a muchos negros que de otra manera no hubieran tenido representación legal.

Inicialmente comprometido con los métodos no violentos de resistencia, siguiendo la inspiración de Gandhi, Mandela y otros 150 compañeros son arrestados el 5 de diciembre de 1956 y sentenciados a prisión, que cumplen entre 1956 hasta ser liberados en 1961, cuando se les declaró no culpables.

Entre 1952 y 1959, el Congreso Nacional Africano sufre una ruptura, y surge una nueva clase de activistas negros, los africanistas, en demanda de acciones más drásticas contra el régimen del Partido Nacional. La dirección del Congreso Nacional Africano, liderada por Albert Lutuli, Oliver Tambo y Walter Sisulu, sienten no sólo que los acontecimientos se precipitan, sino también que su liderazgo comienza a estar en juego. En consecuencia refuerzan su posición mediante alianzas con pequeños partidos políticos de diversa representación étnica, intentando aparecer con horizontes más amplios que los africanistas.

El estatuto de la libertad emitido en la conferencia de Kliptown es ridiculizado por los africanistas por permitir que los 100.000 votos del Congreso Nacional Africano sean relegados a un voto simple en una alianza parlamentaria, en la que cuatro de los cinco secretarios generales representantes de los partidos políticos eran miembros del Partido Comunista Sudafricano (SACP), el más leal de los partidos comunistas a la ideología de Moscú, y que por entonces había sido secretamente reconstituido.

En 1959 el Congreso Nacional Africano pierde su soporte militante cuando la mayoría de los africanistas, con apoyo económico de Ghana y ayuda de los Basotho en el Transvaal, se separan para formar el Congreso Pan-Africano (PAC), bajo la dirección de Robert Sobukwe y Potlako Leballo.

En marzo de 1960, tras la Masacre de Sharpeville sufrida por los activistas del PAC, y la consecuente exclusión política del SACP y el ANC, ambos se suman al Movimiento de Resistencia Africano (renegados liberales), y el PAC comienza la resistencia armada. El ANC/SACP utiliza la Conferencia Pan-Africana de 1961, en la que todos los partidos deciden una estrategia común, para una dramática llamada a las armas de Mandela, anunciando la formación del comando "Umkhonto we Sizwe" (Lanza de la nación), a imagen de los movimientos guerrilleros judíos (Irgún). Dicho comando fue dirigido por el mismo Mandela, con ayuda de activistas judíos como Denis Goldberg, Lionel Bernstein y Harold Wolpe. Mandela estuvo involucrado en el planeamiento de actividades de resistencia armada y era considerado un terrorista tanto por las autoridades del régimen sudafricano como por la ONU.

Mandela abandonó en secreto el país y se encontró con los líderes africanos en Argelia y otros lugares. Empieza a descubrir la profundidad del apoyo al Congreso Pan-Africano, y la creencia generalizada de que el Congreso Nacional Africano era una pequeña asociación tribal Xhosa manipulada por blancos comunistas, y retorna entonces a Sudáfrica decidido a reorganizar los elementos nacionalistas africanos en la alianza parlamentaria.

[editar] Símbolo de libertad

Mandela fue el prisionero número 466/64, esto es que fue el preso número 466 en 1964 en la isla de Robben, durante 27 años en precarias condiciones. El gobierno de Sudáfrica rechazó todas las peticiones de que fuera puesto en libertad. Mandela se convirtió en un símbolo de la lucha contra el apartheid dentro y fuera del país, una figura legendaria que representaba la falta de libertad de todos los hombres negros sudafricanos.

[editar] Prisión

Nelson Mandela fue encarcelado en la prisión de Robben Island, donde permaneció durante dieciocho de sus veintisiete años de presidio. Mientras estuvo en la cárcel, su reputación creció y llegó a ser conocido como el líder negro más importante en Sudáfrica. En prisión, él y otros realizaban trabajos forzados en una cantera de cal. Las condiciones de reclusión eran muy rigurosas. Los prisioneros fueron segregados por raza y los negros recibían menos raciones. Los presos políticos eran separados de los delincuentes comunes y tenían menos privilegios. Mandela, como prisionero del grupo más bajo de la clasificación, sólo tenía permitido recibir una visita y una carta cada seis meses. Las cartas, si llegaban, eran a menudo retrasadas durante largos períodos y leídas por los censores de la prisión.

Mientras estuvo en la cárcel Mandela estudió por correspondencia a través del programa externo de la Universidad de Londres, obteniendo el grado de Licenciado en Derecho. Fue nombrado para el cargo de Rector de la Universidad de Londres en las elecciones de 1981, pero ganó la Princesa Anne.

Uno de los aspectos menos conocidos de su cautiverio fue la falsa operación de fuga que el servicio secreto Sudafricano preparó en 1969. El verdadero objetivo era asesinar a Mandela bajo la apariencia de una recaptura. Pero el Servicio de Inteligencia Británico tuvo conocimiento del complot y frustró toda la operación. El agente secreto inglés Gordon Winter lo narra en su libro de memorias "Inside Boss", publicado en 1981.

En marzo de 1982 Mandela fue transferido de la isla de Robben a la prisión de Pollsmoor, junto con otros altos dirigentes del ANC: Walter Sisulu, Andrew Mlangeni, Ahmed Kathrada y Raymond Mhlaba. Se ha especulado que se trataba de eliminar la influencia de estos líderes en la nueva generación de jóvenes activistas negros encarcelados en Robben Island.[cita requerida] Sin embargo, el Partido Nacional, por medio del ministro Kobie Coetsee, dijo que la medida era para permitir un contacto discreto entre ellos y el Gobierno sudafricano. En febrero de 1985 el Presidente Botha ofreció la liberación condicional de Mandela a cambio de renunciar a la lucha armada. Coetsee y otros ministros habían desaconsejado a Botha que tomara esta decisión, argumentando que Mandela nunca comprometería a su organización a abandonar la lucha armada a cambio de la libertad personal. Mandela rechazó de hecho la oferta, haciendo un comunicado a través de su hija Zindzi diciendo: "¿Qué libertad se me ofrece, mientras sigue prohibida la organización de la gente? Sólo los hombres libres pueden negociar. Un preso no puede entrar en los contratos."

La primera reunión entre Mandela y el Partido Nacional llegó en noviembre de 1985, cuando se reunió Kobie Coetsee con Mandela en el Volks Hospital en Ciudad del Cabo, donde Mandela se estaba recuperando de una cirugía de próstata. Durante los próximos cuatro años, tuvieron lugar una serie de reuniones que sentaron las bases para futuros contactos y negociaciones, pero se hicieron pocos avances reales.

En 1988 Mandela fue trasladado a la prisión Víctor Verster, permaneciendo allí hasta su liberación. Diversas restricciones fueron levantadas y personas como Harry Schwarz pudieron visitarlo. Schwarz, un amigo de Mandela, lo conocía desde la universidad cuando fueron compañeros de clase. También fue un abogado defensor en el proceso de Rivonia y más tarde será embajador de Sudáfrica en Washington.

A lo largo del encarcelamiento de Mandela, las presiones locales e internacionales sobre el gobierno de Sudáfrica para dejar a Mandela en libertad, eran notorias y en 1989, Sudáfrica llegó a una encrucijada cuando el Presidente Botha sufrió un derrame cerebral y fue sustituido por Frederik Willem de Klerk. De Klerk anunció la liberación de Mandela en febrero de 1990.

[editar] Premios y condecoraciones

Escultura de Nelson Mandela en Johannesburgo.

Mandela ha recibido alrededor de 50 doctorados honoris causa por distintas universidades del mundo. Junto a la Madre Teresa de Calcuta, además de Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan, ha sido el único extranjero que ha sido distinguido con Bharat Ratna, el premio civil de mayor prestigio de la India en 1958.

[editar] Música

Hay muchos grupos que se inspiraron en Mandela para sus canciones, por ejemplo:

[editar] Cine

Precedido por:
Frederik Willem de Klerk
Presidente de Sudáfrica
Sudafrica
10 de mayo de 199416 de junio de 1999
Sucedido por:
Thabo Mbeki


Predecesor:
Rigoberta Menchú
Nobel prize medal.svg
Premio Nobel de la Paz
1993
Sucesor:
Yasser Arafat
Shimon Peres
Yitzhak Rabin

[editar] Véase también

[editar] Referencias

[editar] Bibliografía

En inglés

[editar] Enlaces externos

Nelson Mandela

De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
Saltar a: navegación, búsqueda
Para otros usos de este término, véase Mandela (Italia).
Nelson Mandela Premio Nobel de paz
Nelson Mandela
10 de mayo de 1994 – 14 de junio de 1999
Vicepresidente   Frederik Willem de Klerk
Thabo Mbeki
Predecesor Frederik Willem de Klerk (presidente del Estado de Sudáfrica)
Sucesor Thabo Mbeki
Datos personales
Nacimiento 18 de julio de 1918 (93 años)
Bandera de Sudáfrica Mvezo, El Cabo, Unión de Sudáfrica
Partido Congreso Nacional Africano
Profesión Abogado
Religión Metodista
Firma Firma de Nelson Mandela
Sitio web Mandela Foundation

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (IPA: [roli'ɬaɬa]) (Mvezo, Unión de Sudáfrica, 18 de julio de 1918), conocido en su país, Sudáfrica, como Madiba, (título honorífico otorgado por los ancianos del clan de Mandela; también era llamado Tata); abogado y político, fue el primer presidente de Sudáfrica elegido democráticamente mediante sufragio universal así como el líder del Umkhonto we Sizwe, el brazo armado del Congreso Nacional Africano (CNA).

En 1962 fue arrestado y condenado por sabotaje, además de otros cargos, a cadena perpetua. Estuvo 27 años en la cárcel, la mayoría de los cuales estuvo confinado en la prisión de Robben Island. Tras su liberación el 11 de febrero de 1990, Mandela lideró a su partido en las negociaciones para conseguir una democracia multirracial en Sudáfrica, cosa que se consiguió en 1994 con las primeras elecciones democráticas por sufragio universal. Mandela ganó las elecciones y fue presidente desde 1994 hasta 1999, dando frecuentemente prioridad a su reconciliación.

Recibió más de 250 premios y reconocimientos internacionales durante cuatro décadas, incluido en 1993 el Premio Nobel de la Paz.

Contenido

[editar] Vida de Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela nació el 18 de julio de 1918 en Mvezo, un poblado de 300 habitantes cerca de Umtata en el Transkei. Pertenecía al clan Madiba de la etnia xhosa, fue uno de los 13 hijos, que tuvo su padre Gadla Henry Mphakanyiswa o (también llamado Henry Mgadla Mandela), con sus cuatro esposas por un consejero principal de la casa real Thembu; a su vez era nieto de rey (Ngubengcuka, que falleció en el año 1832); su madre era Nonqaphi Nosekeni Fanny tercera de las esposas de Gadla Henry Mphakanyiswa.[1]

Mandela en 1937.

Después de finalizar la secundaria, comenzó a estudiar en el Colegio Universitario de Fort Hare para obtener su título de Bachiller en Artes. Allí fue elegido como miembro del Consejo de Representantes Estudiantiles, fue expulsado junto con un compañero, por participar en una huelga estudiantil. Se trasladó a Johannesburgo, donde en 1941 completó sus estudios de bachillerato por correspondencia en la Unisa. Luego estudió derecho en la Universidad de Wiswatersrand, donde se graduó, en 1942, como abogado.[2]

Se casó tres veces, teniendo 6 hijos. De su primera esposa Evelyn Ntoko Mase, fallecida en julio de 2003 de neumonía,[3] se divorció en 1957 después de 14 años de matrimonio. Una hija de este matrimonio murió en edad de lactancia. Su primer hijo Madiba Thembekili falleció en 1969 en un accidente automovilístico. El 6 de enero de 2005 murió el segundo hijo de Mandela y de su primera esposa, Makgatho Mandela, a la edad de 54 años en Johannesburgo a raíz de una enfermedad asociada al sida, era abogado y hombre de negocios, casado dos veces y padre de 4 hijos.

Después de 38 años de matrimonio con Winnie Madikizela (Winnie Mandela), se separó a causa de escándalos políticos en abril de 1992 y finalmente se divorció el 19 de marzo de 1996. Con Winnie tuvo dos hijas, Zenani (Zeni), nacida el 4 de febrero de 1958, y Zindziswa (Zindzi), nacida en 1960.

En su 80º cumpleaños, el 18 de julio de 1998, contrajo matrimonio con Graça Machel, la viuda de Samora Machel, el antiguo presidente de Mozambique y patrocinador del ANC, fallecido en 1986 en un accidente de avión.

Mandela es un apasionado de la música clásica de Georg Friedrich Händel o Piotr Ilich Tchaikovsky, que acostumbra escuchar disfrutando de los atardeceres.

[editar] Actividad política

Después de la creación del Partido Nacional Sudafricano en 1948, con su política de segregación racial, (el apartheid), Mandela cobra importancia dentro del Congreso Nacional Africano, especialmente en la Campaña de desobediencia civil de 1952, y el Congreso del Pueblo de 1955, en el que la adopción de la "Carta de la Libertad" provee el programa principal en la causa contra el apartheid.

Durante esta época, Mandela y el abogado Oliver Tambo dirigen un despacho de abogados que proporciona consejo legal de bajo costo a muchos negros que de otra manera no hubieran tenido representación legal.

Inicialmente comprometido con los métodos no violentos de resistencia, siguiendo la inspiración de Gandhi, Mandela y otros 150 compañeros son arrestados el 5 de diciembre de 1956 y sentenciados a prisión, que cumplen entre 1956 hasta ser liberados en 1961, cuando se les declaró no culpables.

Entre 1952 y 1959, el Congreso Nacional Africano sufre una ruptura, y surge una nueva clase de activistas negros, los africanistas, en demanda de acciones más drásticas contra el régimen del Partido Nacional. La dirección del Congreso Nacional Africano, liderada por Albert Lutuli, Oliver Tambo y Walter Sisulu, sienten no sólo que los acontecimientos se precipitan, sino también que su liderazgo comienza a estar en juego. En consecuencia refuerzan su posición mediante alianzas con pequeños partidos políticos de diversa representación étnica, intentando aparecer con horizontes más amplios que los africanistas.

El estatuto de la libertad emitido en la conferencia de Kliptown es ridiculizado por los africanistas por permitir que los 100.000 votos del Congreso Nacional Africano sean relegados a un voto simple en una alianza parlamentaria, en la que cuatro de los cinco secretarios generales representantes de los partidos políticos eran miembros del Partido Comunista Sudafricano (SACP), el más leal de los partidos comunistas a la ideología de Moscú, y que por entonces había sido secretamente reconstituido.

En 1959 el Congreso Nacional Africano pierde su soporte militante cuando la mayoría de los africanistas, con apoyo económico de Ghana y ayuda de los Basotho en el Transvaal, se separan para formar el Congreso Pan-Africano (PAC), bajo la dirección de Robert Sobukwe y Potlako Leballo.

En marzo de 1960, tras la Masacre de Sharpeville sufrida por los activistas del PAC, y la consecuente exclusión política del SACP y el ANC, ambos se suman al Movimiento de Resistencia Africano (renegados liberales), y el PAC comienza la resistencia armada. El ANC/SACP utiliza la Conferencia Pan-Africana de 1961, en la que todos los partidos deciden una estrategia común, para una dramática llamada a las armas de Mandela, anunciando la formación del comando "Umkhonto we Sizwe" (Lanza de la nación), a imagen de los movimientos guerrilleros judíos (Irgún). Dicho comando fue dirigido por el mismo Mandela, con ayuda de activistas judíos como Denis Goldberg, Lionel Bernstein y Harold Wolpe. Mandela estuvo involucrado en el planeamiento de actividades de resistencia armada y era considerado un terrorista tanto por las autoridades del régimen sudafricano como por la ONU.

Mandela abandonó en secreto el país y se encontró con los líderes africanos en Argelia y otros lugares. Empieza a descubrir la profundidad del apoyo al Congreso Pan-Africano, y la creencia generalizada de que el Congreso Nacional Africano era una pequeña asociación tribal Xhosa manipulada por blancos comunistas, y retorna entonces a Sudáfrica decidido a reorganizar los elementos nacionalistas africanos en la alianza parlamentaria.

[editar] Símbolo de libertad

Mandela fue el prisionero número 466/64, esto es que fue el preso número 466 en 1964 en la isla de Robben, durante 27 años en precarias condiciones. El gobierno de Sudáfrica rechazó todas las peticiones de que fuera puesto en libertad. Mandela se convirtió en un símbolo de la lucha contra el apartheid dentro y fuera del país, una figura legendaria que representaba la falta de libertad de todos los hombres negros sudafricanos.

[editar] Prisión

Nelson Mandela fue encarcelado en la prisión de Robben Island, donde permaneció durante dieciocho de sus veintisiete años de presidio. Mientras estuvo en la cárcel, su reputación creció y llegó a ser conocido como el líder negro más importante en Sudáfrica. En prisión, él y otros realizaban trabajos forzados en una cantera de cal. Las condiciones de reclusión eran muy rigurosas. Los prisioneros fueron segregados por raza y los negros recibían menos raciones. Los presos políticos eran separados de los delincuentes comunes y tenían menos privilegios. Mandela, como prisionero del grupo más bajo de la clasificación, sólo tenía permitido recibir una visita y una carta cada seis meses. Las cartas, si llegaban, eran a menudo retrasadas durante largos períodos y leídas por los censores de la prisión.

Mientras estuvo en la cárcel Mandela estudió por correspondencia a través del programa externo de la Universidad de Londres, obteniendo el grado de Licenciado en Derecho. Fue nombrado para el cargo de Rector de la Universidad de Londres en las elecciones de 1981, pero ganó la Princesa Anne.

Uno de los aspectos menos conocidos de su cautiverio fue la falsa operación de fuga que el servicio secreto Sudafricano preparó en 1969. El verdadero objetivo era asesinar a Mandela bajo la apariencia de una recaptura. Pero el Servicio de Inteligencia Británico tuvo conocimiento del complot y frustró toda la operación. El agente secreto inglés Gordon Winter lo narra en su libro de memorias "Inside Boss", publicado en 1981.

En marzo de 1982 Mandela fue transferido de la isla de Robben a la prisión de Pollsmoor, junto con otros altos dirigentes del ANC: Walter Sisulu, Andrew Mlangeni, Ahmed Kathrada y Raymond Mhlaba. Se ha especulado que se trataba de eliminar la influencia de estos líderes en la nueva generación de jóvenes activistas negros encarcelados en Robben Island.[cita requerida] Sin embargo, el Partido Nacional, por medio del ministro Kobie Coetsee, dijo que la medida era para permitir un contacto discreto entre ellos y el Gobierno sudafricano. En febrero de 1985 el Presidente Botha ofreció la liberación condicional de Mandela a cambio de renunciar a la lucha armada. Coetsee y otros ministros habían desaconsejado a Botha que tomara esta decisión, argumentando que Mandela nunca comprometería a su organización a abandonar la lucha armada a cambio de la libertad personal. Mandela rechazó de hecho la oferta, haciendo un comunicado a través de su hija Zindzi diciendo: "¿Qué libertad se me ofrece, mientras sigue prohibida la organización de la gente? Sólo los hombres libres pueden negociar. Un preso no puede entrar en los contratos."

La primera reunión entre Mandela y el Partido Nacional llegó en noviembre de 1985, cuando se reunió Kobie Coetsee con Mandela en el Volks Hospital en Ciudad del Cabo, donde Mandela se estaba recuperando de una cirugía de próstata. Durante los próximos cuatro años, tuvieron lugar una serie de reuniones que sentaron las bases para futuros contactos y negociaciones, pero se hicieron pocos avances reales.

En 1988 Mandela fue trasladado a la prisión Víctor Verster, permaneciendo allí hasta su liberación. Diversas restricciones fueron levantadas y personas como Harry Schwarz pudieron visitarlo. Schwarz, un amigo de Mandela, lo conocía desde la universidad cuando fueron compañeros de clase. También fue un abogado defensor en el proceso de Rivonia y más tarde será embajador de Sudáfrica en Washington.

A lo largo del encarcelamiento de Mandela, las presiones locales e internacionales sobre el gobierno de Sudáfrica para dejar a Mandela en libertad, eran notorias y en 1989, Sudáfrica llegó a una encrucijada cuando el Presidente Botha sufrió un derrame cerebral y fue sustituido por Frederik Willem de Klerk. De Klerk anunció la liberación de Mandela en febrero de 1990.

[editar] Premios y condecoraciones

Escultura de Nelson Mandela en Johannesburgo.

Mandela ha recibido alrededor de 50 doctorados honoris causa por distintas universidades del mundo. Junto a la Madre Teresa de Calcuta, además de Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan, ha sido el único extranjero que ha sido distinguido con Bharat Ratna, el premio civil de mayor prestigio de la India en 1958.

[editar] Música

Hay muchos grupos que se inspiraron en Mandela para sus canciones, por ejemplo:

[editar] Cine

Precedido por:
Frederik Willem de Klerk
Presidente de Sudáfrica
Sudafrica
10 de mayo de 199416 de junio de 1999
Sucedido por:
Thabo Mbeki


Predecesor:
Rigoberta Menchú
Nobel prize medal.svg
Premio Nobel de la Paz
1993
Sucesor:
Yasser Arafat
Shimon Peres
Yitzhak Rabin

[editar] Véase también

[editar] Referencias

[editar] Bibliografía

En inglés

[editar] Enlaces externos

Biografía en audio

In April 1994, the world watched as millions of South Africans, most of them jubilant but many wary, cast their ballots in that nation's first multiracial election. The outcome: Nelson Mandela became president of a new South Africa.

Mandela's journey from freedom fighter to president capped a dramatic half-century-long struggle against white rule and the institution of apartheid. This five-part series, originally produced in 2004, marked the 10th anniversary of South Africa's first free election.

Produced for NPR by Joe Richman of Radio Diaries and Sue Johnson, Mandela: An Audio History tells the story of the struggle against apartheid through rare sound recordings of Mandela himself, as well as those who fought with and against him.

In This Series:

Part 1: The Birth of Apartheid (1944-1960)

In the 1940s, Nelson Mandela was one of thousands of blacks who flocked to Johannesburg in search of work. At that time, a new political party came into power promoting a new idea: the separation of whites and blacks. Apartheid was born and along with it, a half-century-long struggle to achieve democracy in South Africa. (Transcript)

Part 2: The Underground Movement (1960-1964)

In 1960, with the African National Congress banned, resistance to apartheid went underground. Faced with an intensified government crackdown, Mandela launched Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK) — a military wing of the ANC — and the armed struggle began. Two years later, Mandela was arrested and sentenced for high treason. He and eight others were sentenced to life in prison. (Transcript)

Part 3: Robben Island (1964-1976)

As Mandela and other political leaders languished in prison, the government crackdown appeared to have crushed the resistance movement. But on June 16, 1976, a student uprising in Soweto sparked a new generation of activism. (Transcript)

Part 4: State of Emergency (1976-1990)

Guerilla soldiers on the border, unrest in the townships, striking workers and a wave of international attention were making South Africa's system of apartheid untenable. Something had to give — and it did on Feb. 2, 1990, when South African President F.W. de Klerk announced he would lift a 30-year ban on the ANC and free Mandela after 27 years in prison. (Transcript)

Part 5: Democracy (1990-1994)

On April 27, 1994, Nelson Mandela was elected South Africa's first black president. But that triumph didn't come easily. The four years between Mandela's release and the transition to democracy were some of the most volatile and painful in the country's history. (Transcript)

In April 1994, the world watched as millions of South Africans, most of them jubilant but many wary, cast their ballots in that nation's first multiracial election. The outcome: Nelson Mandela became president of a new South Africa.

Mandela's journey from freedom fighter to president capped a dramatic half-century-long struggle against white rule and the institution of apartheid. This five-part series, originally produced in 2004, marked the 10th anniversary of South Africa's first free election.

Produced for NPR by Joe Richman of Radio Diaries and Sue Johnson, Mandela: An Audio History tells the story of the struggle against apartheid through rare sound recordings of Mandela himself, as well as those who fought with and against him.

In This Series:

Part 1: The Birth of Apartheid (1944-1960)

In the 1940s, Nelson Mandela was one of thousands of blacks who flocked to Johannesburg in search of work. At that time, a new political party came into power promoting a new idea: the separation of whites and blacks. Apartheid was born and along with it, a half-century-long struggle to achieve democracy in South Africa. (Transcript)

Part 2: The Underground Movement (1960-1964)

In 1960, with the African National Congress banned, resistance to apartheid went underground. Faced with an intensified government crackdown, Mandela launched Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK) — a military wing of the ANC — and the armed struggle began. Two years later, Mandela was arrested and sentenced for high treason. He and eight others were sentenced to life in prison. (Transcript)

Part 3: Robben Island (1964-1976)

As Mandela and other political leaders languished in prison, the government crackdown appeared to have crushed the resistance movement. But on June 16, 1976, a student uprising in Soweto sparked a new generation of activism. (Transcript)

Part 4: State of Emergency (1976-1990)

Guerilla soldiers on the border, unrest in the townships, striking workers and a wave of international attention were making South Africa's system of apartheid untenable. Something had to give — and it did on Feb. 2, 1990, when South African President F.W. de Klerk announced he would lift a 30-year ban on the ANC and free Mandela after 27 years in prison. (Transcript)

Part 5: Democracy (1990-1994)

On April 27, 1994, Nelson Mandela was elected South Africa's first black president. But that triumph didn't come easily. The four years between Mandela's release and the transition to democracy were some of the most volatile and painful in the country's history. (Transcript)

Su primera entrevista en televisón (1961)

Su primera entrevista en televisón (1961)

Su discurso de investidura de Nelson Mandela

Su discurso de investidura de Nelson Mandela

En Facebook

Mandela Day

10 curiosidades

Sudáfrica se encuentra de fiesta por el cumpleaños número 93 de Nelson Mandela, uno de los personajes más representativos de este país, por lo que te presentamos diez de sus curiosidades.
2011     10 curiosidades sobre Nelson Mandela

Debido a la celebración de un aniversario más de vida del incansable activista sudafricano, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, alrededor de 12 millones de niños cantaron el Happy Birthday en honor al ex mandatario, poco antes de iniciar sus clases.

Así mismo, otra gran parte de la población sudafricana dedicó al menos 67 minutos de trabajo comunitario, honrando así a la misma cantidad de años que Madiba otorgó este mismo acto servicial con su sociedad.

Casi siete décadas fueron las que Mandela se dedicó a luchar contra la segregación racial, causa que lo mantuvo en la prisión de Robben Island durante 27 años.

Gracias a este trabajo, hoy en día es uno de los luchadores sociales más respetados y queridos a nivel internacional, pero sobre todo en su propia nación, en donde tiene todo el reconocimiento por ayudar a reunificar a un pueblo separado por el apartheid.

Incluso el presidente estadounidense Barack Obama externó algunas palabras de admiración para este ejemplar hombre: "Madiba establece el estándar para el servicio en todo el mundo, si somos estudiantes, comerciantes o agricultores, ministros o presidentes" -dijo-. "Él nos llama a servir a nuestros semejantes, y mejorar a nuestras comunidades".

Así, sin ningún acto de celebración pública, el ex político y líder antisegregacionista que se retiró en 2004 llegó desde el viernes pasado a Qunu, la aldea en donde creció, para celebrar su cumpleaños acompañado por su extensa familia.

En el marco de este festejo, Sexenio presenta diez curiosidades sobre Nelson Mandela.

***

- El ex presidente sudafricano tuvo 12 hermanos y nació en Mvezo, un poblado de apenas 300 habitantes. En 2009, el 18 de julio fue designado por la ONU como el Día de Mandela.

- Nelson Mandela estudió el bachillerato en Johannesburgo y posteriormente se graduó de la Universidad de Wiswatersrand, completando la carrera de Derecho.

- Es un apasionado de la música clásica y admira a autores como Georg Friedrich Händel o Piotr Ilich Tchaikovsky, a quienes acostumbra escuchar disfrutando de los atardeceres.

- El apartheid fue un fenómeno de segregación racial en Sudáfrica implantado por colonizadores ingleses, como símbolo de una sucesión de discriminación política, económica, social y racial. Tras muchos años de revoluciones y resistencias, entre 1990 y 1991 fue desmantelado el sistema legal sobre el que éste se basaba.

- Bajo este régimen, Mandela pasó 27 años en prisión tras ser declarado culpable de sabotaje e intentos de derrocar al gobierno, condenado a cadena perpetua. Fue liberado tras la caída de dicho sistema en 1990 y cuatro años despues se convirtió en el primer Presidente electo democráticamente por sufragio universal.

- 18 de los 27 años de encarcelamiento los pasó en la prisión de Robben Island, lugar en donde su reputación creció hasta ser conocido como una figura legendaria que representaba la falta de libertad que padecían todos los hombres de raza negra. Fue el prisionero número 466/64 (el preso número 466 en el año 1964).

- Las precarias condiciones de su encierro incluyeron trabajos forzados en una cantera de cal, además de que existía una segregación interna por razas en donde los negros recibían menos raciones y privilegios. Aunque sólo tenía permitido recibir una visita y una carta cada seis meses, estudió por correspondencia a través del programa externo de la Universidad de Londres, obteniendo el grado de Licenciado en Derecho.

- Según el libro Inside Boss (1981) de Gordon Winter, un agente secreto británico, narra la falsa operación de fuga que el Servicio Secreto Sudafricano preparó en 1969, cuyo verdadero objetivo era asesinar a Mandela bajo la apariencia de una recaptura. Sin embargo, el Servicio de Inteligencia Británico descubrió el complot y frustró el plan.

- El cariñoso apodo de Madiba que  se ha ganado, es en realidad un título honorífico otorgado por los ancianos del clan de Mandela, quien también ha sido llamado Tata.

- A lo largo de 40 años ha recibido más de 250 premios y reconocimientos internacionales, incluyendo el Premio Nobel de la Paz en 1993.

 

Sudáfrica se encuentra de fiesta por el cumpleaños número 93 de Nelson Mandela, uno de los personajes más representativos de este país, por lo que te presentamos diez de sus curiosidades.
2011     10 curiosidades sobre Nelson Mandela

Debido a la celebración de un aniversario más de vida del incansable activista sudafricano, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, alrededor de 12 millones de niños cantaron el Happy Birthday en honor al ex mandatario, poco antes de iniciar sus clases.

Así mismo, otra gran parte de la población sudafricana dedicó al menos 67 minutos de trabajo comunitario, honrando así a la misma cantidad de años que Madiba otorgó este mismo acto servicial con su sociedad.

Casi siete décadas fueron las que Mandela se dedicó a luchar contra la segregación racial, causa que lo mantuvo en la prisión de Robben Island durante 27 años.

Gracias a este trabajo, hoy en día es uno de los luchadores sociales más respetados y queridos a nivel internacional, pero sobre todo en su propia nación, en donde tiene todo el reconocimiento por ayudar a reunificar a un pueblo separado por el apartheid.

Incluso el presidente estadounidense Barack Obama externó algunas palabras de admiración para este ejemplar hombre: "Madiba establece el estándar para el servicio en todo el mundo, si somos estudiantes, comerciantes o agricultores, ministros o presidentes" -dijo-. "Él nos llama a servir a nuestros semejantes, y mejorar a nuestras comunidades".

Así, sin ningún acto de celebración pública, el ex político y líder antisegregacionista que se retiró en 2004 llegó desde el viernes pasado a Qunu, la aldea en donde creció, para celebrar su cumpleaños acompañado por su extensa familia.

En el marco de este festejo, Sexenio presenta diez curiosidades sobre Nelson Mandela.

***

- El ex presidente sudafricano tuvo 12 hermanos y nació en Mvezo, un poblado de apenas 300 habitantes. En 2009, el 18 de julio fue designado por la ONU como el Día de Mandela.

- Nelson Mandela estudió el bachillerato en Johannesburgo y posteriormente se graduó de la Universidad de Wiswatersrand, completando la carrera de Derecho.

- Es un apasionado de la música clásica y admira a autores como Georg Friedrich Händel o Piotr Ilich Tchaikovsky, a quienes acostumbra escuchar disfrutando de los atardeceres.

- El apartheid fue un fenómeno de segregación racial en Sudáfrica implantado por colonizadores ingleses, como símbolo de una sucesión de discriminación política, económica, social y racial. Tras muchos años de revoluciones y resistencias, entre 1990 y 1991 fue desmantelado el sistema legal sobre el que éste se basaba.

- Bajo este régimen, Mandela pasó 27 años en prisión tras ser declarado culpable de sabotaje e intentos de derrocar al gobierno, condenado a cadena perpetua. Fue liberado tras la caída de dicho sistema en 1990 y cuatro años despues se convirtió en el primer Presidente electo democráticamente por sufragio universal.

- 18 de los 27 años de encarcelamiento los pasó en la prisión de Robben Island, lugar en donde su reputación creció hasta ser conocido como una figura legendaria que representaba la falta de libertad que padecían todos los hombres de raza negra. Fue el prisionero número 466/64 (el preso número 466 en el año 1964).

- Las precarias condiciones de su encierro incluyeron trabajos forzados en una cantera de cal, además de que existía una segregación interna por razas en donde los negros recibían menos raciones y privilegios. Aunque sólo tenía permitido recibir una visita y una carta cada seis meses, estudió por correspondencia a través del programa externo de la Universidad de Londres, obteniendo el grado de Licenciado en Derecho.

- Según el libro Inside Boss (1981) de Gordon Winter, un agente secreto británico, narra la falsa operación de fuga que el Servicio Secreto Sudafricano preparó en 1969, cuyo verdadero objetivo era asesinar a Mandela bajo la apariencia de una recaptura. Sin embargo, el Servicio de Inteligencia Británico descubrió el complot y frustró el plan.

- El cariñoso apodo de Madiba que  se ha ganado, es en realidad un título honorífico otorgado por los ancianos del clan de Mandela, quien también ha sido llamado Tata.

- A lo largo de 40 años ha recibido más de 250 premios y reconocimientos internacionales, incluyendo el Premio Nobel de la Paz en 1993.

 

Condecoraciones

Artículo de la Enciclopedia Libre Universal en Español.

Fue el primer presidente de Sudáfrica en ser elegido por medios democráticos bajo sufragio universal. Tiempo antes de ser elegido presidente fue un importante activista contra el apartheid que, pese a ser encarcelado durante 27 años, estuvo involucrado en el planeamiento de actividades de resistencia armada. Sin embargo, la lucha armada fue, para Mandela, una "última alternativa"; Mandela siempre usó métodos no violentos. Durante su tiempo en prisión (la mayoría de éste, encerrado en una celda en Robben Island), Mandela se convirtió en la figura más conocida de la lucha contra el apartheid en Sudáfrica. Pese a que el régimen del apartheid y las naciones aliadas a éste lo consideraron junto al Congreso Nacional Africano como un terrorista, su lucha fue parte íntegra de la campaña contra el apartheid. El cambio de políticas contra éste, que Mandela apoyó con su liberación en 1990, facilitó una pacífica transición a la democracia representativa en Sudáfrica. Después de haber recibido más de una centena de premios por más de cuatro décadas, Mandela es actualmente un célebre estadista que continúa dando su opinión en temas fundamentales. En Sudáfrica es conocido como Madiba, un título honorario adoptado por ancianos de la tribu de Mandela. Varios sudafricanos también se refieren a él como 'mkhulu' (abuelo).

[escribe] Actividad política

Después de la victoria del Partido Nacional Sudafricano en 1948, con su política de segregación racial, (el apartheid), Mandela cobra importancia dentro del Congreso Nacional Africano, especialmente en la Campaña de desobediencia civil de 1952 , y el Congreso del Pueblo de 1955 , en el que la adopción de la "Carta de la Libertad" provee el programa principal en la causa contra el apartheid. Durante esta época, Mandela y su abogado amigo, Oliver Tambo, dirigen el estudio de abogacía Mandela y Tambo, que provee consejo legal de bajo costo a muchos negros que de otra manera no hubieran tenido representación legal.

Inicialmente comprometido con los métodos no violentos de resistencia, siguiendo la inspiración de Ghandi , Mandela y otros 150 compañeros son arrestados el 5 de Diciembre de 1956, y sentenciados a prisión, que cumplen entre 1956 y 1961 hasta ser liberados. Entre 1952 y 1959 el Congreso Nacional Africano sufre una ruptura, y surge una nueva clase de activistas negros, los africanistas, en demanda de acciones más drásticas contra el régimen del Partido Nacional.

La conducción del Congreso, liderada por Albert Luthuli, Oliver Tambo y Walter Sisulu sienten no sólo que los acontecimientos se precipitan, sino también que su liderazgo comienza a estar en juego. En consecuencia refuerzan su posición mediante alianzas con pequeños partidos políticos de diversa representación étnica, intentando aparecer con horizontes más amplios que los africanistas.

El estatuto de la libertad emitido en la conferencia de Kliptown es ridiculizado por los africanistas por permitir que los 100.000 votos del Congreso Nacional Africano sean relegados a un voto simple en una alianza parlamentaria, en la que cuatro de los cinco secretarios generales representativos de los partidos políticos eran miembros del Partido Comunista Sudafricano (SACP), el más esclavista de los partidos comunistas en la ideología de Moscú, y que por entonces había sido secretamente reconstituido.

En 1959 el Congreso Nacional Africano pierde su soporte militante cuando la mayoría de los africanistas, con apoyo económico de Ghana y ayuda de los Basotho en el Transvaal, se separan para formar el Congreso Pan-Africano (PAC), bajo la conducción de Robert Sobukwe y Potlako Leballo. En marzo de 1960, luego de la masacre de los seguidores del PAC en Sharpeville, y la conecuente exclusión política del SACP y el ANC, ambos se suman al Movimiento de Resistencia Africano (renegados liberales), y el PAC comienza la resistencia armada. Luthuli, criticado por su inercia, es sorteado, y el ANC/SACP utiliza la Conferencia Pan-Africana de 1961 , en la que todos los partidos deciden una estrategia común, para un dramático llamado a las armas de Mandela, anunciando la formación del comando "Umkhonto we Sizwe" Umkhonto we Sizwe= "Lanza de la nación", copiado de los movimientos guerrilleros judíos (Irgun) , dirigido por el mismo Mandela, con ayuda de activistas judíos como Denis Goldberg, Lionel Bernstein y Harold Wolpe.

Luego Mandela abandona en secreto el país, y se encuentra con los líderes africanos en Argelia y en otros sitios. Empieza a descubrir la profundidad del apoyo al Congreso Pan-Africano, y la creencia generalizada que el Congreso Nacional Africano era una pequeña asociación tribal Xhosa manipulada por blancos comunistas, y retorna entonces a Sudáfrica decidido a reorganizar los elementos nacionalistas africanos en la alianza parlamentaria. Se sospecha que una acalorada discusión con los líderes comunistas sobre este punto, fue la causa de su detención y arresto cerca de Howick. Mandela no detalla estos hechos en su biografía.

[escribe] Arresto y prisión

En 1961 Mandela se convierte en el líder del brazo armado del Congreso Nacional Africano (Umkhonto we Sizwe), también abreviado "MK". Coordina una campaña de sabotajes contra blancos militares y gubernamentales, y hace planes para una posible guerra de guerrillas si el sabotaje fallara en terminar con el apartheid.

Unas pocas décadas después, MK mantiene sin duda una guerrilla contra el régimen, especialmente a partir de 1980. Mandela también busca fondos para mejorar la MK, y hace arreglos para el entrenamiento paramilitar, visitando a varios gobiernos africanos.

El 5 de Agosto de 1962 es arrestado tras vivir huyendo durante varios meses, y reducido a prisión en el fuerte de Johannesburgo. William Blum, ex empleado del Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos, cuenta que la CIA informó a la policía sobre el paradero de Mandela. Tres días después le leen los cargos de dirigir una huelga en 1961 y de abandonar ilegalmente el país. El 25 de octubre de 1962, es sentenciado a cinco años en prisión. Dos años más tarde, el 11 de junio de 1964, la pena se da por cumplida teniendo en cuenta su participación anterior en el Congreso Nacional Africano.

Mientras Mandela se encuentra en prisión, el 11 de julio de 1963, la policía arresta a prominentes líderes del ANC en Liliesleaf Farm, Rivonia, al norte de Johannesburgo. Mandela es trasladado allí, y en el juicio de Rivonia, junto a Ahmed Kathrada, Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbeki, Andrew Mlangeni, Raymond Mhlaba, Elias Motsoaledi, Walter Mkwayi (que escapa durante el juicio), Arthur Goldreich (que escapa después del juicio), Denis Goldberg y Lionel Bernstein son acusados de crímenes capitales de sabotaje, equiparables a traición, pero más fáciles de probar para el gobierno.

En su alegato al abrir la defensa en juicio, el 20 de abril de 1964, ante la Suprema Corte en Pretoria, Mandela se esfuerza en demostrar la racionalidad en la elección del ANC de usar la táctica de la violencia. Su discurso revela la forma en que el partido utilizó medios pacíficos de resistencia hasta la masacre de Sharperville. Aquel hecho coincidió con el referéndum que establecía la Republica Sudafricana, la declaración de un estado de emergencia y la exclusión del ANC, lo que convertía al sabotaje en la única forma posible de resistencia. hacer otra cosa hubiera resultado equivalente a una rendición incondicional. Mandela explica como desarrolló el manifiesto de Umkhonto, intentando producir la caída del Partido Nacional mediante la caída de la economía producida por el alejamiento de los inversores externos ante el crecimiento del riesgo del país.

Junto con sus compañeros de lucha es condenado a cadena perpetua. Ese mismo año lo nombran presidente del ANC.

[escribe] Símbolo de libertad

Mandela fue el prisionero número 46664 durante 27 años en penosas condiciones. El gobierno de Sudáfrica rechazó todas las peticiones de que fuera puesto en libertad. Mandela se convirtió, al igual que Mahatma Gandhi, en un símbolo de la lucha contra el apartheid dentro y fuera del país, una figura legendaria que representaba la falta de libertad de todos los hombres de color sudafricanos.

[escribe] Presidente de Sudáfrica

En 1984 el gobierno intentó acabar con tan incómodo mito, ofreciéndole la libertad si aceptaba establecerse en uno de los bantustanes a los que el régimen había concedido una ficción de independencia; Mandela rechazó el ofrecimiento. Durante aquellos años, su esposa Winnie simbolizó la continuidad de la lucha, alcanzando importantes posiciones en el ANC. Finalmente, Frederik De Klerk, presidente de la República por el Partido Nacional, hubo de ceder ante la evidencia y abrir el camino para desmontar la segregación racial, liberando a Mandela en 1990 y convirtiéndole en su principal interlocutor para negociar el proceso de democratización. Mandela y De Klerk compartieron el Premio Nobel de la Paz en 1993.

Las elecciones de 1994 convirtieron a Mandela en el primer presidente negro de Sudáfrica; desde ese cargo puso en marcha una política de reconciliación nacional, manteniendo a De Klerk como vicepresidente, y tratando de atraer hacia la participación democrática al díscolo partido Inkhata de mayoría zulú.

[escribe] Premios y condecoraciones

  • Embajador de la conciencia, premio otorgado por Amnistía Internacional (2006)
  • Llaves de la ciudad - Johannesburgo (2004)
  • Premio Nobel de la Paz en 1993
  • Premio de la Paz de Mahatma Gandhi.
  • Orden de Canadá
  • Premio Príncipe de Asturias a la cooperación internacional
  • Orden de San Juan
  • Medalla presidencial de la libertad
  • Orden al mérito (1995)
  • Isithwalandwe (1992)
  • Bharat Ratna (1990)
  • Premio Sajarov (1988)
  • Premio Lenin de la Paz (1962)
  • Premio Internacional Simón Bolívar (1983)
  • Premio nacional de la paz (1995)
  • Escultura en el Palacio de Westmister (Londres)(2007)

[escribe] Lectura adicional

Inglés

[escribe] Filmografía

Películas sobre Mandela

Música sobre Mandela

Bibliografía
El contenido de este artículo incorpora material de una entrada de la Wikipedia, publicada con licencia CC-BY-SA 3.0.

  • Mandela: The Authorised Biography, por Anthony Sampson
  • Long Walk to Freedom (Largo camino a la libertad) , autobiografía de Nelson Mandela escrita en prisión.

Otras fuentes de información

Notas

Artículo de la Enciclopedia Libre Universal en Español.

Fue el primer presidente de Sudáfrica en ser elegido por medios democráticos bajo sufragio universal. Tiempo antes de ser elegido presidente fue un importante activista contra el apartheid que, pese a ser encarcelado durante 27 años, estuvo involucrado en el planeamiento de actividades de resistencia armada. Sin embargo, la lucha armada fue, para Mandela, una "última alternativa"; Mandela siempre usó métodos no violentos. Durante su tiempo en prisión (la mayoría de éste, encerrado en una celda en Robben Island), Mandela se convirtió en la figura más conocida de la lucha contra el apartheid en Sudáfrica. Pese a que el régimen del apartheid y las naciones aliadas a éste lo consideraron junto al Congreso Nacional Africano como un terrorista, su lucha fue parte íntegra de la campaña contra el apartheid. El cambio de políticas contra éste, que Mandela apoyó con su liberación en 1990, facilitó una pacífica transición a la democracia representativa en Sudáfrica. Después de haber recibido más de una centena de premios por más de cuatro décadas, Mandela es actualmente un célebre estadista que continúa dando su opinión en temas fundamentales. En Sudáfrica es conocido como Madiba, un título honorario adoptado por ancianos de la tribu de Mandela. Varios sudafricanos también se refieren a él como 'mkhulu' (abuelo).

[escribe] Actividad política

Después de la victoria del Partido Nacional Sudafricano en 1948, con su política de segregación racial, (el apartheid), Mandela cobra importancia dentro del Congreso Nacional Africano, especialmente en la Campaña de desobediencia civil de 1952 , y el Congreso del Pueblo de 1955 , en el que la adopción de la "Carta de la Libertad" provee el programa principal en la causa contra el apartheid. Durante esta época, Mandela y su abogado amigo, Oliver Tambo, dirigen el estudio de abogacía Mandela y Tambo, que provee consejo legal de bajo costo a muchos negros que de otra manera no hubieran tenido representación legal.

Inicialmente comprometido con los métodos no violentos de resistencia, siguiendo la inspiración de Ghandi , Mandela y otros 150 compañeros son arrestados el 5 de Diciembre de 1956, y sentenciados a prisión, que cumplen entre 1956 y 1961 hasta ser liberados. Entre 1952 y 1959 el Congreso Nacional Africano sufre una ruptura, y surge una nueva clase de activistas negros, los africanistas, en demanda de acciones más drásticas contra el régimen del Partido Nacional.

La conducción del Congreso, liderada por Albert Luthuli, Oliver Tambo y Walter Sisulu sienten no sólo que los acontecimientos se precipitan, sino también que su liderazgo comienza a estar en juego. En consecuencia refuerzan su posición mediante alianzas con pequeños partidos políticos de diversa representación étnica, intentando aparecer con horizontes más amplios que los africanistas.

El estatuto de la libertad emitido en la conferencia de Kliptown es ridiculizado por los africanistas por permitir que los 100.000 votos del Congreso Nacional Africano sean relegados a un voto simple en una alianza parlamentaria, en la que cuatro de los cinco secretarios generales representativos de los partidos políticos eran miembros del Partido Comunista Sudafricano (SACP), el más esclavista de los partidos comunistas en la ideología de Moscú, y que por entonces había sido secretamente reconstituido.

En 1959 el Congreso Nacional Africano pierde su soporte militante cuando la mayoría de los africanistas, con apoyo económico de Ghana y ayuda de los Basotho en el Transvaal, se separan para formar el Congreso Pan-Africano (PAC), bajo la conducción de Robert Sobukwe y Potlako Leballo. En marzo de 1960, luego de la masacre de los seguidores del PAC en Sharpeville, y la conecuente exclusión política del SACP y el ANC, ambos se suman al Movimiento de Resistencia Africano (renegados liberales), y el PAC comienza la resistencia armada. Luthuli, criticado por su inercia, es sorteado, y el ANC/SACP utiliza la Conferencia Pan-Africana de 1961 , en la que todos los partidos deciden una estrategia común, para un dramático llamado a las armas de Mandela, anunciando la formación del comando "Umkhonto we Sizwe" Umkhonto we Sizwe= "Lanza de la nación", copiado de los movimientos guerrilleros judíos (Irgun) , dirigido por el mismo Mandela, con ayuda de activistas judíos como Denis Goldberg, Lionel Bernstein y Harold Wolpe.

Luego Mandela abandona en secreto el país, y se encuentra con los líderes africanos en Argelia y en otros sitios. Empieza a descubrir la profundidad del apoyo al Congreso Pan-Africano, y la creencia generalizada que el Congreso Nacional Africano era una pequeña asociación tribal Xhosa manipulada por blancos comunistas, y retorna entonces a Sudáfrica decidido a reorganizar los elementos nacionalistas africanos en la alianza parlamentaria. Se sospecha que una acalorada discusión con los líderes comunistas sobre este punto, fue la causa de su detención y arresto cerca de Howick. Mandela no detalla estos hechos en su biografía.

[escribe] Arresto y prisión

En 1961 Mandela se convierte en el líder del brazo armado del Congreso Nacional Africano (Umkhonto we Sizwe), también abreviado "MK". Coordina una campaña de sabotajes contra blancos militares y gubernamentales, y hace planes para una posible guerra de guerrillas si el sabotaje fallara en terminar con el apartheid.

Unas pocas décadas después, MK mantiene sin duda una guerrilla contra el régimen, especialmente a partir de 1980. Mandela también busca fondos para mejorar la MK, y hace arreglos para el entrenamiento paramilitar, visitando a varios gobiernos africanos.

El 5 de Agosto de 1962 es arrestado tras vivir huyendo durante varios meses, y reducido a prisión en el fuerte de Johannesburgo. William Blum, ex empleado del Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos, cuenta que la CIA informó a la policía sobre el paradero de Mandela. Tres días después le leen los cargos de dirigir una huelga en 1961 y de abandonar ilegalmente el país. El 25 de octubre de 1962, es sentenciado a cinco años en prisión. Dos años más tarde, el 11 de junio de 1964, la pena se da por cumplida teniendo en cuenta su participación anterior en el Congreso Nacional Africano.

Mientras Mandela se encuentra en prisión, el 11 de julio de 1963, la policía arresta a prominentes líderes del ANC en Liliesleaf Farm, Rivonia, al norte de Johannesburgo. Mandela es trasladado allí, y en el juicio de Rivonia, junto a Ahmed Kathrada, Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbeki, Andrew Mlangeni, Raymond Mhlaba, Elias Motsoaledi, Walter Mkwayi (que escapa durante el juicio), Arthur Goldreich (que escapa después del juicio), Denis Goldberg y Lionel Bernstein son acusados de crímenes capitales de sabotaje, equiparables a traición, pero más fáciles de probar para el gobierno.

En su alegato al abrir la defensa en juicio, el 20 de abril de 1964, ante la Suprema Corte en Pretoria, Mandela se esfuerza en demostrar la racionalidad en la elección del ANC de usar la táctica de la violencia. Su discurso revela la forma en que el partido utilizó medios pacíficos de resistencia hasta la masacre de Sharperville. Aquel hecho coincidió con el referéndum que establecía la Republica Sudafricana, la declaración de un estado de emergencia y la exclusión del ANC, lo que convertía al sabotaje en la única forma posible de resistencia. hacer otra cosa hubiera resultado equivalente a una rendición incondicional. Mandela explica como desarrolló el manifiesto de Umkhonto, intentando producir la caída del Partido Nacional mediante la caída de la economía producida por el alejamiento de los inversores externos ante el crecimiento del riesgo del país.

Junto con sus compañeros de lucha es condenado a cadena perpetua. Ese mismo año lo nombran presidente del ANC.

[escribe] Símbolo de libertad

Mandela fue el prisionero número 46664 durante 27 años en penosas condiciones. El gobierno de Sudáfrica rechazó todas las peticiones de que fuera puesto en libertad. Mandela se convirtió, al igual que Mahatma Gandhi, en un símbolo de la lucha contra el apartheid dentro y fuera del país, una figura legendaria que representaba la falta de libertad de todos los hombres de color sudafricanos.

[escribe] Presidente de Sudáfrica

En 1984 el gobierno intentó acabar con tan incómodo mito, ofreciéndole la libertad si aceptaba establecerse en uno de los bantustanes a los que el régimen había concedido una ficción de independencia; Mandela rechazó el ofrecimiento. Durante aquellos años, su esposa Winnie simbolizó la continuidad de la lucha, alcanzando importantes posiciones en el ANC. Finalmente, Frederik De Klerk, presidente de la República por el Partido Nacional, hubo de ceder ante la evidencia y abrir el camino para desmontar la segregación racial, liberando a Mandela en 1990 y convirtiéndole en su principal interlocutor para negociar el proceso de democratización. Mandela y De Klerk compartieron el Premio Nobel de la Paz en 1993.

Las elecciones de 1994 convirtieron a Mandela en el primer presidente negro de Sudáfrica; desde ese cargo puso en marcha una política de reconciliación nacional, manteniendo a De Klerk como vicepresidente, y tratando de atraer hacia la participación democrática al díscolo partido Inkhata de mayoría zulú.

[escribe] Premios y condecoraciones

  • Embajador de la conciencia, premio otorgado por Amnistía Internacional (2006)
  • Llaves de la ciudad - Johannesburgo (2004)
  • Premio Nobel de la Paz en 1993
  • Premio de la Paz de Mahatma Gandhi.
  • Orden de Canadá
  • Premio Príncipe de Asturias a la cooperación internacional
  • Orden de San Juan
  • Medalla presidencial de la libertad
  • Orden al mérito (1995)
  • Isithwalandwe (1992)
  • Bharat Ratna (1990)
  • Premio Sajarov (1988)
  • Premio Lenin de la Paz (1962)
  • Premio Internacional Simón Bolívar (1983)
  • Premio nacional de la paz (1995)
  • Escultura en el Palacio de Westmister (Londres)(2007)

[escribe] Lectura adicional

Inglés

[escribe] Filmografía

Películas sobre Mandela

Música sobre Mandela

Bibliografía
El contenido de este artículo incorpora material de una entrada de la Wikipedia, publicada con licencia CC-BY-SA 3.0.

  • Mandela: The Authorised Biography, por Anthony Sampson
  • Long Walk to Freedom (Largo camino a la libertad) , autobiografía de Nelson Mandela escrita en prisión.

Otras fuentes de información

Notas

Youssou N'Dour le homenajea en su álbum 'Nelson Mandela' en 1986

Youssou N'Dour le homenajea en su álbum 'Nelson Mandela' en 1986