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Anti-Muslim Video

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Innocence of Muslims - Muhammad Movie - FULL HD

Innocence of Muslims - Muhammad Movie - FULL HD

Should Google censor an anti-Islam video? - CNN.com

A protester hits a policeman with a pole in Sydney's central business district on Saturday, September 15. Anger over an anti-Islam video, "The Innocence of Muslims," spread to Australia on Saturday, and protesters took to the streets of the country's capital. A protester hits a policeman with a pole in Sydney's central business district on Saturday, September 15. Anger over an anti-Islam video, "The Innocence of Muslims," spread to Australia on Saturday, and protesters took to the streets of the country's capital.
A man assists a young protester after capsicum spray was used by police near the U.S. Consulate General in central Sydney on Saturday. A man assists a young protester after capsicum spray was used by police near the U.S. Consulate General in central Sydney on Saturday.
 A policeman, injured by protesters, is assisted by colleagues in central Sydney on Saturday. A policeman, injured by protesters, is assisted by colleagues in central Sydney on Saturday.
A Tunisian firefighter works inside a destroyed school building in the grounds of the American school in Tunis, Tunisia, on Saturday. Four people were killed and almost 50 injured in an attack on the U.S. Embassy in Tunis the day before by protesters angry over an anti-Islam film, the health ministry said. A Tunisian firefighter works inside a destroyed school building in the grounds of the American school in Tunis, Tunisia, on Saturday. Four people were killed and almost 50 injured in an attack on the U.S. Embassy in Tunis the day before by protesters angry over an anti-Islam film, the health ministry said.
A burned bus sits in the grounds of the American school in Tunis on Saturday. A burned bus sits in the grounds of the American school in Tunis on Saturday.
A woman collects books from a classroom in the American school in Tunis on Saturday. A woman collects books from a classroom in the American school in Tunis on Saturday.
Muslim protesters holding shoes and brooms shout anti-U.S. slogans on Saturday during a protest against the film they consider blasphemous to Islam near the U.S. Consulate-General in Chennai, India. Muslim protesters holding shoes and brooms shout anti-U.S. slogans on Saturday during a protest against the film they consider blasphemous to Islam near the U.S. Consulate-General in Chennai, India.
Supporters of Islamic political party Jamaat-e-Islami shout slogans during a protest on Saturday in Khyber Agency, Pakistan. The Pakistani parliament passed a resolution on Thursday condemning "The Innocence of Muslims" and urged the U.S. to take appropriate action. Supporters of Islamic political party Jamaat-e-Islami shout slogans during a protest on Saturday in Khyber Agency, Pakistan. The Pakistani parliament passed a resolution on Thursday condemning "The Innocence of Muslims" and urged the U.S. to take appropriate action.
Supporters of Islamic political party Jamaat-e-Islami shout slogans during a protest in Khyber Agency on Saturday. Supporters of Islamic political party Jamaat-e-Islami shout slogans during a protest in Khyber Agency on Saturday.
Pakistani Muslims burn a U.S. flag during a protest rally in Islamabad on Saturday. The Pakistani Taliban on Saturday issued a call to young Muslims worldwide and within the country to rise up against an anti-Islam movie. Pakistani Muslims burn a U.S. flag during a protest rally in Islamabad on Saturday. The Pakistani Taliban on Saturday issued a call to young Muslims worldwide and within the country to rise up against an anti-Islam movie.
Mourners shout slogans during the funeral of a protester who was killed two days ago during clashes with security forces at the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Saturday . According to media reports, at least four people were killed when hundreds of Yemeni protesters stormed the embassy on Wednesday. Mourners shout slogans during the funeral of a protester who was killed two days ago during clashes with security forces at the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Saturday . According to media reports, at least four people were killed when hundreds of Yemeni protesters stormed the embassy on Wednesday.
Smoke billows from the burning German Embassy in Khartoum, Sudan, as a policeman stands next to a man preparing to extinguish the fire caused by protesters the anti-Islam film. Around 5,000 protesters in the Sudanese capital stormed the embassies of Britain and Germany, which were torched and badly damaged. Smoke billows from the burning German Embassy in Khartoum, Sudan, as a policeman stands next to a man preparing to extinguish the fire caused by protesters the anti-Islam film. Around 5,000 protesters in the Sudanese capital stormed the embassies of Britain and Germany, which were torched and badly damaged.
 A Sudanese protester, right, takes off his clothes to show policemen that he is unarmed during a protest in Khartoum on Friday. Two protesters were killed as security forces used tear gas against thousands of demonstrators trying to approach the U.S. mission after storming the British and German embassies. A Sudanese protester, right, takes off his clothes to show policemen that he is unarmed during a protest in Khartoum on Friday. Two protesters were killed as security forces used tear gas against thousands of demonstrators trying to approach the U.S. mission after storming the British and German embassies.
A Jordanian protester holds an Islamic book near the U.S. Embassy in Amman, Jordan, on Friday. Hundreds of members of Jordanian Salafi Movement gathered after Friday noon prayers in protest of a controversial anti-Islam film. A Jordanian protester holds an Islamic book near the U.S. Embassy in Amman, Jordan, on Friday. Hundreds of members of Jordanian Salafi Movement gathered after Friday noon prayers in protest of a controversial anti-Islam film.
Police stand guard near protesters near the U.S. Consulate General in Sydney on Saturday, September 15. Police stand guard near protesters near the U.S. Consulate General in Sydney on Saturday, September 15.
Protesters clash with police on a street in Sydney's central business district on Saturday. Protesters clash with police on a street in Sydney's central business district on Saturday.
Indian policemen walk past smashed windows of the U.S. Consulate building, caused by a mob of demonstrators protesting against an anti-Islam film, in Chennai, India, on Friday, September 14. Indian policemen walk past smashed windows of the U.S. Consulate building, caused by a mob of demonstrators protesting against an anti-Islam film, in Chennai, India, on Friday, September 14.
Tunisian protesters try to storm the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Friday. Tunisian protesters try to storm the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Friday.
A Tunisian protester holds an Al-Qaeda affiliated flag amid the smoke coming from the tear gas fired by riot police outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Friday. A Tunisian protester holds an Al-Qaeda affiliated flag amid the smoke coming from the tear gas fired by riot police outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Friday.
Yemeni riot policemen stand guard at a crossroad leading to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday. Yemeni riot policemen stand guard at a crossroad leading to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday.
Yemeni protesters burn a U.S. flag on a street leading to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday, September 14. Yemeni protesters burn a U.S. flag on a street leading to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday, September 14.
Yemeni protesters shout during a demonstration near the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday. Yemeni protesters shout during a demonstration near the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday.
Yemeni protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police in Sanaa on Friday. Yemeni protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police in Sanaa on Friday.
Jordanian protesters burn a U.S. flag near the U.S. Embassy in Amman on Friday. Jordanian protesters burn a U.S. flag near the U.S. Embassy in Amman on Friday.
Jordanian protesters shout in Amman on Friday. Jordanian protesters shout in Amman on Friday.
Israeli police officers stand behind their shields during clashes with stone-throwing Palestinian protesters in a demonstration against an anti-Islam film in front of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem's Old City on Friday. Israeli police officers stand behind their shields during clashes with stone-throwing Palestinian protesters in a demonstration against an anti-Islam film in front of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem's Old City on Friday.
Israeli police arrest a Palestinian protester on Friday. Israeli police arrest a Palestinian protester on Friday.
Boys inspect fast food chains Hardee's and KFC after they were torched during a protest in the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli on Friday. Boys inspect fast food chains Hardee's and KFC after they were torched during a protest in the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli on Friday.
Bangladeshi Muslims attempt to break a police barricade during a protest in Dhaka on Friday. Bangladeshi Muslims attempt to break a police barricade during a protest in Dhaka on Friday.
Supporters of Jamat ud Dawa shout during a protest against an anti-Islam video in Peshawar, Pakistan, on Friday. Supporters of Jamat ud Dawa shout during a protest against an anti-Islam video in Peshawar, Pakistan, on Friday.
A Muslim protester defaces a mural on a wall of the U.S. Consulate in the southern Indian city of Chennai on Friday. A Muslim protester defaces a mural on a wall of the U.S. Consulate in the southern Indian city of Chennai on Friday.
Muslim protesters burn a U.S. flag outside the U.S. Consulate in the southern Indian city of Chennai on Friday. Muslim protesters burn a U.S. flag outside the U.S. Consulate in the southern Indian city of Chennai on Friday.
Muslim protesters shout outside the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Friday. Muslim protesters shout outside the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Friday.
Pakistani soldiers hold back protesters attempting to reach the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad on Friday. Pakistani soldiers hold back protesters attempting to reach the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad on Friday.
An Egyptian protester throws a tear gas canister toward riot police during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Friday. An Egyptian protester throws a tear gas canister toward riot police during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Friday.
A Sudanese demonstrator burns a German flag after torching the German Embassy in Khartoum on Friday. A Sudanese demonstrator burns a German flag after torching the German Embassy in Khartoum on Friday.
Protesters throw stones toward riot police during clashes along a road leading to the U.S. Embassy near Tahrir Square in Cairo on Friday, September 14. Protesters throw stones toward riot police during clashes along a road leading to the U.S. Embassy near Tahrir Square in Cairo on Friday, September 14.
A riot police officer shouts a warning during clashes in Cairo on Friday. A riot police officer shouts a warning during clashes in Cairo on Friday.
Protesters chant during a march to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Thursday, September 13. One protester was killed in clashes when Yemeni security forces dispersed hundreds of demonstrators who gathered around and inside the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa. Protesters chant during a march to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Thursday, September 13. One protester was killed in clashes when Yemeni security forces dispersed hundreds of demonstrators who gathered around and inside the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa.
A protester shouts after sustaining injuries in a confrontation with riot police who fired tear gas outside the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Thursday. A protester shouts after sustaining injuries in a confrontation with riot police who fired tear gas outside the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Thursday.
Protesters carry flags that read "There is no God but Allah, Mohammed is Allah's messenger" and chant during a protest in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Thursday. Protesters carry flags that read "There is no God but Allah, Mohammed is Allah's messenger" and chant during a protest in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Thursday.
Palestinians protest the movie "Innocence of Muslims" in front of the Legislative Council in Gaza City on Thursday. Palestinians protest the movie "Innocence of Muslims" in front of the Legislative Council in Gaza City on Thursday.
Iranian demonstrators chant anti-American slogans during a demonstration on Thursday in front of the Swiss Embassy, which serves as the U.S. interests section in Iran, in Tehran. Iranian demonstrators chant anti-American slogans during a demonstration on Thursday in front of the Swiss Embassy, which serves as the U.S. interests section in Iran, in Tehran.
An Iranian police officer shows a victory sign during Thursday's demonstration in Tehran. An Iranian police officer shows a victory sign during Thursday's demonstration in Tehran.
Supporters of Sunni Muslim Salafist leader Ahmad al-Assir burn Israeli and U.S. flags during a protest in Sidon, Lebanon, on Thursday. Supporters of Sunni Muslim Salafist leader Ahmad al-Assir burn Israeli and U.S. flags during a protest in Sidon, Lebanon, on Thursday.
Kuwaiti police stand guard as hundreds of demonstrators protest near the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait City on Thursday. Kuwaiti police stand guard as hundreds of demonstrators protest near the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait City on Thursday.
Arab-Israeli men wave green Islamic flags with the Muslim profession of belief: "There is no God but God and Mohammed is the prophet of God" during a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy on Thursday in Tel Aviv, Israel. Arab-Israeli men wave green Islamic flags with the Muslim profession of belief: "There is no God but God and Mohammed is the prophet of God" during a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy on Thursday in Tel Aviv, Israel.
Egyptian protesters throw stones at riot police during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Thursday. Egyptian protesters throw stones at riot police during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Thursday.
 Riot police take cover from stones thrown by protesters on Thursday. Riot police take cover from stones thrown by protesters on Thursday.
Egyptian protesters help a man who inhaled tear gas during clashes at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Thursday. Egyptian protesters help a man who inhaled tear gas during clashes at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Thursday.
A burned-out pickup sits between Egyptian protesters and riot police in Cairo on Thursday. A burned-out pickup sits between Egyptian protesters and riot police in Cairo on Thursday.
Egyptian protesters take cover during clashes with riot police on Thursday. Egyptian protesters take cover during clashes with riot police on Thursday.
An Egyptian protester wears a makeshift mask and helmet for protection while fighting riot police on Thursday. An Egyptian protester wears a makeshift mask and helmet for protection while fighting riot police on Thursday.
Egyptian protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police during clashes on Thursday. Egyptian protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police during clashes on Thursday.
An Egyptian riot police officer fires tear gas toward protesters during clashes Thursday with police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. An Egyptian riot police officer fires tear gas toward protesters during clashes Thursday with police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Iraqi protesters burn Israeli and U.S. flags during a protest Thursday. The U.S. ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens, and three others were killed during a protest outside the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Tuesday. Iraqi protesters burn Israeli and U.S. flags during a protest Thursday. The U.S. ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens, and three others were killed during a protest outside the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Tuesday.
Egyptian protesters clash with riot police Thursday near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. Egyptian protesters clash with riot police Thursday near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Iranians protest against a film mocking Islam near the Swiss Embassy in Tehran on Thursday. Up to 500 people chanted "Death to America!" and death to the director of the movie, which was made in the United States. The demonstration ended peacefully in two hours. Iranians protest against a film mocking Islam near the Swiss Embassy in Tehran on Thursday. Up to 500 people chanted "Death to America!" and death to the director of the movie, which was made in the United States. The demonstration ended peacefully in two hours.
An Egyptian protester throws a tear gas canister at riot police Thursday during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. An Egyptian protester throws a tear gas canister at riot police Thursday during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Police use tear gas on crowds protesting Thursday outside the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. Police use tear gas on crowds protesting Thursday outside the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is seen in flames Tuesday, September 11. The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is seen in flames Tuesday, September 11.
A vehicle and the surrounding area are engulfed in flames after it was set on fire inside the compound on Tuesday. A vehicle and the surrounding area are engulfed in flames after it was set on fire inside the compound on Tuesday.
A protester reacts as the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is seen in flames Tuesday night. A protester reacts as the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is seen in flames Tuesday night.
Yemeni protesters gather around a fire Thursday during a demonstration outside the U.S. Embassy in the capital of Sanaa. Yemeni forces fired warning shots to disperse the thousands of protesters approaching the main gate of the mission. Yemeni protesters gather around a fire Thursday during a demonstration outside the U.S. Embassy in the capital of Sanaa. Yemeni forces fired warning shots to disperse the thousands of protesters approaching the main gate of the mission.
Yemeni protesters try to break the security camera at the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Thursday. Yemeni protesters try to break the security camera at the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Thursday.
Egyptians shout slogans during a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. Egyptians shout slogans during a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Egyptian protesters gather in front of the U.S. Embassy the morning after it was vandalized by protesters during a demonstration on Wednesday in Cairo. Egyptian protesters gather in front of the U.S. Embassy the morning after it was vandalized by protesters during a demonstration on Wednesday in Cairo.
Protesters shout outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis, Tunisia, on Wednesday, September 12. Protesters shout outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis, Tunisia, on Wednesday, September 12.
A group of protesters attend a demonstration outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Wednesday. A group of protesters attend a demonstration outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Wednesday.
A demonstrator walks on a U.S. flag during a Wednesday's demonstration at the U.S. Embassy in Tunis. A demonstrator walks on a U.S. flag during a Wednesday's demonstration at the U.S. Embassy in Tunis.
People inspect the damage at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Wednesday, the day after four people were killed. People inspect the damage at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Wednesday, the day after four people were killed.
Egyptian demonstrators continue to stake out the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Wednesday. Egyptian demonstrators continue to stake out the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Wednesday.
Police confront protesters praying in front of the U.S. Embassy in Casablanca, Morocco, during a rally against the anti-Islam film on Wednesday. Police confront protesters praying in front of the U.S. Embassy in Casablanca, Morocco, during a rally against the anti-Islam film on Wednesday.
Moroccan women gather near the U.S. Embassy in Casablanca on Wednesday. Moroccan women gather near the U.S. Embassy in Casablanca on Wednesday.
A Palestinian man holds a placard praising Islam's prophet Mohammed during a demonstration against the film on Wednesday in front of the United Nations headquarters in Gaza City. A Palestinian man holds a placard praising Islam's prophet Mohammed during a demonstration against the film on Wednesday in front of the United Nations headquarters in Gaza City.
Palestinian men burn the American flag during Wednesday's demonstration in Gaza City. Palestinian men burn the American flag during Wednesday's demonstration in Gaza City.
A man waves his rifle as buildings and cars are engulfed in flames inside the U.S. Consulate compound in Benghazi, Libya, late on Tuesday, September 11. A man waves his rifle as buildings and cars are engulfed in flames inside the U.S. Consulate compound in Benghazi, Libya, late on Tuesday, September 11.
The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is set on fire during a protest. Armed gunmen attacked the compound on Tuesday evening, clashing with Libyan security forces before the latter withdrew as they came under heavy fire. The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is set on fire during a protest. Armed gunmen attacked the compound on Tuesday evening, clashing with Libyan security forces before the latter withdrew as they came under heavy fire.
Protesters destroy an American flag pulled down from the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters destroy an American flag pulled down from the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt.
People stand around a drawing that says "Remember your black day 11 September" during the protest in Cairo. People stand around a drawing that says "Remember your black day 11 September" during the protest in Cairo.
People shout and light flares in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. People shout and light flares in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
People shout in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. People shout in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Protesters pull down a U.S. flag. Protesters pull down a U.S. flag.
Thousands were angered by the controversial film. Thousands were angered by the controversial film.
Demonstrators yell outside the U.S. Embassy. Demonstrators yell outside the U.S. Embassy.
Egyptian riot police stand guard as protesters climb down from the wall. Egyptian riot police stand guard as protesters climb down from the wall.
An Egyptian protester waves a black flag inscribed with the Muslim profession of faith -- "There is no God but God, and Mohammed is the prophet of God" -- as he stands above the door of the U.S. Embassy. An Egyptian protester waves a black flag inscribed with the Muslim profession of faith -- "There is no God but God, and Mohammed is the prophet of God" -- as he stands above the door of the U.S. Embassy.
Protesters gather along the U.S. Embassy wall. <a href='http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/12/africa/gallery/libya-us-consulate-attack/index.html'>Photos: Attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya kills four</a> Protesters gather along the U.S. Embassy wall. Photos: Attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya kills four

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

A protester hits a policeman with a pole in Sydney's central business district on Saturday, September 15. Anger over an anti-Islam video, "The Innocence of Muslims," spread to Australia on Saturday, and protesters took to the streets of the country's capital. A protester hits a policeman with a pole in Sydney's central business district on Saturday, September 15. Anger over an anti-Islam video, "The Innocence of Muslims," spread to Australia on Saturday, and protesters took to the streets of the country's capital.
A man assists a young protester after capsicum spray was used by police near the U.S. Consulate General in central Sydney on Saturday. A man assists a young protester after capsicum spray was used by police near the U.S. Consulate General in central Sydney on Saturday.
 A policeman, injured by protesters, is assisted by colleagues in central Sydney on Saturday. A policeman, injured by protesters, is assisted by colleagues in central Sydney on Saturday.
A Tunisian firefighter works inside a destroyed school building in the grounds of the American school in Tunis, Tunisia, on Saturday. Four people were killed and almost 50 injured in an attack on the U.S. Embassy in Tunis the day before by protesters angry over an anti-Islam film, the health ministry said. A Tunisian firefighter works inside a destroyed school building in the grounds of the American school in Tunis, Tunisia, on Saturday. Four people were killed and almost 50 injured in an attack on the U.S. Embassy in Tunis the day before by protesters angry over an anti-Islam film, the health ministry said.
A burned bus sits in the grounds of the American school in Tunis on Saturday. A burned bus sits in the grounds of the American school in Tunis on Saturday.
A woman collects books from a classroom in the American school in Tunis on Saturday. A woman collects books from a classroom in the American school in Tunis on Saturday.
Muslim protesters holding shoes and brooms shout anti-U.S. slogans on Saturday during a protest against the film they consider blasphemous to Islam near the U.S. Consulate-General in Chennai, India. Muslim protesters holding shoes and brooms shout anti-U.S. slogans on Saturday during a protest against the film they consider blasphemous to Islam near the U.S. Consulate-General in Chennai, India.
Supporters of Islamic political party Jamaat-e-Islami shout slogans during a protest on Saturday in Khyber Agency, Pakistan. The Pakistani parliament passed a resolution on Thursday condemning "The Innocence of Muslims" and urged the U.S. to take appropriate action. Supporters of Islamic political party Jamaat-e-Islami shout slogans during a protest on Saturday in Khyber Agency, Pakistan. The Pakistani parliament passed a resolution on Thursday condemning "The Innocence of Muslims" and urged the U.S. to take appropriate action.
Supporters of Islamic political party Jamaat-e-Islami shout slogans during a protest in Khyber Agency on Saturday. Supporters of Islamic political party Jamaat-e-Islami shout slogans during a protest in Khyber Agency on Saturday.
Pakistani Muslims burn a U.S. flag during a protest rally in Islamabad on Saturday. The Pakistani Taliban on Saturday issued a call to young Muslims worldwide and within the country to rise up against an anti-Islam movie. Pakistani Muslims burn a U.S. flag during a protest rally in Islamabad on Saturday. The Pakistani Taliban on Saturday issued a call to young Muslims worldwide and within the country to rise up against an anti-Islam movie.
Mourners shout slogans during the funeral of a protester who was killed two days ago during clashes with security forces at the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Saturday . According to media reports, at least four people were killed when hundreds of Yemeni protesters stormed the embassy on Wednesday. Mourners shout slogans during the funeral of a protester who was killed two days ago during clashes with security forces at the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Saturday . According to media reports, at least four people were killed when hundreds of Yemeni protesters stormed the embassy on Wednesday.
Smoke billows from the burning German Embassy in Khartoum, Sudan, as a policeman stands next to a man preparing to extinguish the fire caused by protesters the anti-Islam film. Around 5,000 protesters in the Sudanese capital stormed the embassies of Britain and Germany, which were torched and badly damaged. Smoke billows from the burning German Embassy in Khartoum, Sudan, as a policeman stands next to a man preparing to extinguish the fire caused by protesters the anti-Islam film. Around 5,000 protesters in the Sudanese capital stormed the embassies of Britain and Germany, which were torched and badly damaged.
 A Sudanese protester, right, takes off his clothes to show policemen that he is unarmed during a protest in Khartoum on Friday. Two protesters were killed as security forces used tear gas against thousands of demonstrators trying to approach the U.S. mission after storming the British and German embassies. A Sudanese protester, right, takes off his clothes to show policemen that he is unarmed during a protest in Khartoum on Friday. Two protesters were killed as security forces used tear gas against thousands of demonstrators trying to approach the U.S. mission after storming the British and German embassies.
A Jordanian protester holds an Islamic book near the U.S. Embassy in Amman, Jordan, on Friday. Hundreds of members of Jordanian Salafi Movement gathered after Friday noon prayers in protest of a controversial anti-Islam film. A Jordanian protester holds an Islamic book near the U.S. Embassy in Amman, Jordan, on Friday. Hundreds of members of Jordanian Salafi Movement gathered after Friday noon prayers in protest of a controversial anti-Islam film.
Police stand guard near protesters near the U.S. Consulate General in Sydney on Saturday, September 15. Police stand guard near protesters near the U.S. Consulate General in Sydney on Saturday, September 15.
Protesters clash with police on a street in Sydney's central business district on Saturday. Protesters clash with police on a street in Sydney's central business district on Saturday.
Indian policemen walk past smashed windows of the U.S. Consulate building, caused by a mob of demonstrators protesting against an anti-Islam film, in Chennai, India, on Friday, September 14. Indian policemen walk past smashed windows of the U.S. Consulate building, caused by a mob of demonstrators protesting against an anti-Islam film, in Chennai, India, on Friday, September 14.
Tunisian protesters try to storm the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Friday. Tunisian protesters try to storm the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Friday.
A Tunisian protester holds an Al-Qaeda affiliated flag amid the smoke coming from the tear gas fired by riot police outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Friday. A Tunisian protester holds an Al-Qaeda affiliated flag amid the smoke coming from the tear gas fired by riot police outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Friday.
Yemeni riot policemen stand guard at a crossroad leading to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday. Yemeni riot policemen stand guard at a crossroad leading to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday.
Yemeni protesters burn a U.S. flag on a street leading to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday, September 14. Yemeni protesters burn a U.S. flag on a street leading to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday, September 14.
Yemeni protesters shout during a demonstration near the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday. Yemeni protesters shout during a demonstration near the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Friday.
Yemeni protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police in Sanaa on Friday. Yemeni protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police in Sanaa on Friday.
Jordanian protesters burn a U.S. flag near the U.S. Embassy in Amman on Friday. Jordanian protesters burn a U.S. flag near the U.S. Embassy in Amman on Friday.
Jordanian protesters shout in Amman on Friday. Jordanian protesters shout in Amman on Friday.
Israeli police officers stand behind their shields during clashes with stone-throwing Palestinian protesters in a demonstration against an anti-Islam film in front of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem's Old City on Friday. Israeli police officers stand behind their shields during clashes with stone-throwing Palestinian protesters in a demonstration against an anti-Islam film in front of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem's Old City on Friday.
Israeli police arrest a Palestinian protester on Friday. Israeli police arrest a Palestinian protester on Friday.
Boys inspect fast food chains Hardee's and KFC after they were torched during a protest in the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli on Friday. Boys inspect fast food chains Hardee's and KFC after they were torched during a protest in the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli on Friday.
Bangladeshi Muslims attempt to break a police barricade during a protest in Dhaka on Friday. Bangladeshi Muslims attempt to break a police barricade during a protest in Dhaka on Friday.
Supporters of Jamat ud Dawa shout during a protest against an anti-Islam video in Peshawar, Pakistan, on Friday. Supporters of Jamat ud Dawa shout during a protest against an anti-Islam video in Peshawar, Pakistan, on Friday.
A Muslim protester defaces a mural on a wall of the U.S. Consulate in the southern Indian city of Chennai on Friday. A Muslim protester defaces a mural on a wall of the U.S. Consulate in the southern Indian city of Chennai on Friday.
Muslim protesters burn a U.S. flag outside the U.S. Consulate in the southern Indian city of Chennai on Friday. Muslim protesters burn a U.S. flag outside the U.S. Consulate in the southern Indian city of Chennai on Friday.
Muslim protesters shout outside the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Friday. Muslim protesters shout outside the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Friday.
Pakistani soldiers hold back protesters attempting to reach the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad on Friday. Pakistani soldiers hold back protesters attempting to reach the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad on Friday.
An Egyptian protester throws a tear gas canister toward riot police during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Friday. An Egyptian protester throws a tear gas canister toward riot police during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Friday.
A Sudanese demonstrator burns a German flag after torching the German Embassy in Khartoum on Friday. A Sudanese demonstrator burns a German flag after torching the German Embassy in Khartoum on Friday.
Protesters throw stones toward riot police during clashes along a road leading to the U.S. Embassy near Tahrir Square in Cairo on Friday, September 14. Protesters throw stones toward riot police during clashes along a road leading to the U.S. Embassy near Tahrir Square in Cairo on Friday, September 14.
A riot police officer shouts a warning during clashes in Cairo on Friday. A riot police officer shouts a warning during clashes in Cairo on Friday.
Protesters chant during a march to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Thursday, September 13. One protester was killed in clashes when Yemeni security forces dispersed hundreds of demonstrators who gathered around and inside the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa. Protesters chant during a march to the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, on Thursday, September 13. One protester was killed in clashes when Yemeni security forces dispersed hundreds of demonstrators who gathered around and inside the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa.
A protester shouts after sustaining injuries in a confrontation with riot police who fired tear gas outside the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Thursday. A protester shouts after sustaining injuries in a confrontation with riot police who fired tear gas outside the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Thursday.
Protesters carry flags that read "There is no God but Allah, Mohammed is Allah's messenger" and chant during a protest in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Thursday. Protesters carry flags that read "There is no God but Allah, Mohammed is Allah's messenger" and chant during a protest in Tripoli, Lebanon, on Thursday.
Palestinians protest the movie "Innocence of Muslims" in front of the Legislative Council in Gaza City on Thursday. Palestinians protest the movie "Innocence of Muslims" in front of the Legislative Council in Gaza City on Thursday.
Iranian demonstrators chant anti-American slogans during a demonstration on Thursday in front of the Swiss Embassy, which serves as the U.S. interests section in Iran, in Tehran. Iranian demonstrators chant anti-American slogans during a demonstration on Thursday in front of the Swiss Embassy, which serves as the U.S. interests section in Iran, in Tehran.
An Iranian police officer shows a victory sign during Thursday's demonstration in Tehran. An Iranian police officer shows a victory sign during Thursday's demonstration in Tehran.
Supporters of Sunni Muslim Salafist leader Ahmad al-Assir burn Israeli and U.S. flags during a protest in Sidon, Lebanon, on Thursday. Supporters of Sunni Muslim Salafist leader Ahmad al-Assir burn Israeli and U.S. flags during a protest in Sidon, Lebanon, on Thursday.
Kuwaiti police stand guard as hundreds of demonstrators protest near the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait City on Thursday. Kuwaiti police stand guard as hundreds of demonstrators protest near the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait City on Thursday.
Arab-Israeli men wave green Islamic flags with the Muslim profession of belief: "There is no God but God and Mohammed is the prophet of God" during a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy on Thursday in Tel Aviv, Israel. Arab-Israeli men wave green Islamic flags with the Muslim profession of belief: "There is no God but God and Mohammed is the prophet of God" during a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy on Thursday in Tel Aviv, Israel.
Egyptian protesters throw stones at riot police during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Thursday. Egyptian protesters throw stones at riot police during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Thursday.
 Riot police take cover from stones thrown by protesters on Thursday. Riot police take cover from stones thrown by protesters on Thursday.
Egyptian protesters help a man who inhaled tear gas during clashes at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Thursday. Egyptian protesters help a man who inhaled tear gas during clashes at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Thursday.
A burned-out pickup sits between Egyptian protesters and riot police in Cairo on Thursday. A burned-out pickup sits between Egyptian protesters and riot police in Cairo on Thursday.
Egyptian protesters take cover during clashes with riot police on Thursday. Egyptian protesters take cover during clashes with riot police on Thursday.
An Egyptian protester wears a makeshift mask and helmet for protection while fighting riot police on Thursday. An Egyptian protester wears a makeshift mask and helmet for protection while fighting riot police on Thursday.
Egyptian protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police during clashes on Thursday. Egyptian protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police during clashes on Thursday.
An Egyptian riot police officer fires tear gas toward protesters during clashes Thursday with police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. An Egyptian riot police officer fires tear gas toward protesters during clashes Thursday with police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Iraqi protesters burn Israeli and U.S. flags during a protest Thursday. The U.S. ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens, and three others were killed during a protest outside the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Tuesday. Iraqi protesters burn Israeli and U.S. flags during a protest Thursday. The U.S. ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens, and three others were killed during a protest outside the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Tuesday.
Egyptian protesters clash with riot police Thursday near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. Egyptian protesters clash with riot police Thursday near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Iranians protest against a film mocking Islam near the Swiss Embassy in Tehran on Thursday. Up to 500 people chanted "Death to America!" and death to the director of the movie, which was made in the United States. The demonstration ended peacefully in two hours. Iranians protest against a film mocking Islam near the Swiss Embassy in Tehran on Thursday. Up to 500 people chanted "Death to America!" and death to the director of the movie, which was made in the United States. The demonstration ended peacefully in two hours.
An Egyptian protester throws a tear gas canister at riot police Thursday during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. An Egyptian protester throws a tear gas canister at riot police Thursday during clashes near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Police use tear gas on crowds protesting Thursday outside the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. Police use tear gas on crowds protesting Thursday outside the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is seen in flames Tuesday, September 11. The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is seen in flames Tuesday, September 11.
A vehicle and the surrounding area are engulfed in flames after it was set on fire inside the compound on Tuesday. A vehicle and the surrounding area are engulfed in flames after it was set on fire inside the compound on Tuesday.
A protester reacts as the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is seen in flames Tuesday night. A protester reacts as the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is seen in flames Tuesday night.
Yemeni protesters gather around a fire Thursday during a demonstration outside the U.S. Embassy in the capital of Sanaa. Yemeni forces fired warning shots to disperse the thousands of protesters approaching the main gate of the mission. Yemeni protesters gather around a fire Thursday during a demonstration outside the U.S. Embassy in the capital of Sanaa. Yemeni forces fired warning shots to disperse the thousands of protesters approaching the main gate of the mission.
Yemeni protesters try to break the security camera at the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Thursday. Yemeni protesters try to break the security camera at the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa on Thursday.
Egyptians shout slogans during a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. Egyptians shout slogans during a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Egyptian protesters gather in front of the U.S. Embassy the morning after it was vandalized by protesters during a demonstration on Wednesday in Cairo. Egyptian protesters gather in front of the U.S. Embassy the morning after it was vandalized by protesters during a demonstration on Wednesday in Cairo.
Protesters shout outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis, Tunisia, on Wednesday, September 12. Protesters shout outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis, Tunisia, on Wednesday, September 12.
A group of protesters attend a demonstration outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Wednesday. A group of protesters attend a demonstration outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunis on Wednesday.
A demonstrator walks on a U.S. flag during a Wednesday's demonstration at the U.S. Embassy in Tunis. A demonstrator walks on a U.S. flag during a Wednesday's demonstration at the U.S. Embassy in Tunis.
People inspect the damage at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Wednesday, the day after four people were killed. People inspect the damage at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Wednesday, the day after four people were killed.
Egyptian demonstrators continue to stake out the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Wednesday. Egyptian demonstrators continue to stake out the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Wednesday.
Police confront protesters praying in front of the U.S. Embassy in Casablanca, Morocco, during a rally against the anti-Islam film on Wednesday. Police confront protesters praying in front of the U.S. Embassy in Casablanca, Morocco, during a rally against the anti-Islam film on Wednesday.
Moroccan women gather near the U.S. Embassy in Casablanca on Wednesday. Moroccan women gather near the U.S. Embassy in Casablanca on Wednesday.
A Palestinian man holds a placard praising Islam's prophet Mohammed during a demonstration against the film on Wednesday in front of the United Nations headquarters in Gaza City. A Palestinian man holds a placard praising Islam's prophet Mohammed during a demonstration against the film on Wednesday in front of the United Nations headquarters in Gaza City.
Palestinian men burn the American flag during Wednesday's demonstration in Gaza City. Palestinian men burn the American flag during Wednesday's demonstration in Gaza City.
A man waves his rifle as buildings and cars are engulfed in flames inside the U.S. Consulate compound in Benghazi, Libya, late on Tuesday, September 11. A man waves his rifle as buildings and cars are engulfed in flames inside the U.S. Consulate compound in Benghazi, Libya, late on Tuesday, September 11.
The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is set on fire during a protest. Armed gunmen attacked the compound on Tuesday evening, clashing with Libyan security forces before the latter withdrew as they came under heavy fire. The U.S. Consulate in Benghazi is set on fire during a protest. Armed gunmen attacked the compound on Tuesday evening, clashing with Libyan security forces before the latter withdrew as they came under heavy fire.
Protesters destroy an American flag pulled down from the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt. Protesters destroy an American flag pulled down from the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt.
People stand around a drawing that says "Remember your black day 11 September" during the protest in Cairo. People stand around a drawing that says "Remember your black day 11 September" during the protest in Cairo.
People shout and light flares in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. People shout and light flares in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
People shout in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. People shout in front of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
Protesters pull down a U.S. flag. Protesters pull down a U.S. flag.
Thousands were angered by the controversial film. Thousands were angered by the controversial film.
Demonstrators yell outside the U.S. Embassy. Demonstrators yell outside the U.S. Embassy.
Egyptian riot police stand guard as protesters climb down from the wall. Egyptian riot police stand guard as protesters climb down from the wall.
An Egyptian protester waves a black flag inscribed with the Muslim profession of faith -- "There is no God but God, and Mohammed is the prophet of God" -- as he stands above the door of the U.S. Embassy. An Egyptian protester waves a black flag inscribed with the Muslim profession of faith -- "There is no God but God, and Mohammed is the prophet of God" -- as he stands above the door of the U.S. Embassy.
Protesters gather along the U.S. Embassy wall. <a href='http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/12/africa/gallery/libya-us-consulate-attack/index.html'>Photos: Attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya kills four</a> Protesters gather along the U.S. Embassy wall. Photos: Attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya kills four

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Muslims hold demonstrations worldwide

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Protesters storm U.S. Embassy buildings

Mideast riots: Who's behind the anti-Islam video? - The Week

Burning Question

posted on September 14, 2012, at 6:45 AM

A screengrab from the violence-inciting trailer of Innocence of Muslims: The U.S. government says the movie was made by Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, a Los Angeles-area Egyptian Coptic Christian with a rap sheet.

A screengrab from the violence-inciting trailer of Innocence of Muslims: The U.S. government says the movie was made by Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, a Los Angeles-area Egyptian Coptic Christian with a rap sheet. Photo: YouTube SEE ALL 114 PHOTOS

The hunt for Sam Bacile, the driving force behind the Islam-defaming movie sparking violent anti-U.S. protests in the Middle East, appears to be over. And he is not the Israeli real estate developer he claimed to be, or even named Sam Bacile. Instead, he's an Egyptian Coptic Christian ex-convict named Nakoula Basseley Nakoula. Who is Nakoula, what's his connection to the troublesome film, and what does he want? Here's a look:

What do we know about Nakoula B. Nakoula?
He's a 55-year-old gas station owner in the Los Angeles suburbs with a rap sheet dating back to the 1990s and an impressive list of aliases. The Daily Beast, citing a source close to the Los Angeles D.A.'s office, says Nakoula pleaded guilty in 1997 to cooking methamphetamine and was sentenced to a year in county jail; he reportedly served another year after violating his parole in 2002. In 2000, he declared bankruptcy for his gas station. In 2010, he was convicted in federal court of a year-long scheme in which he created fake bank accounts with stolen Social Security numbers, then withdrew money on fraudulent checks before they bounced. He was ordered to pay $794,700 in restitution and stay off computers and the internet without explicit permission for five years, and served about a year of a 21-month sentence.

How certain is it that Nakoula is the filmmaker?
The evidence is strong but largely circumstantial. Nakoula admits to offering logistical support for the company that created the film but denies — to both the AP and local Coptic Orthodox prelate Bishop Serapion — that he is Sam Bacile. Then again, "Nakoula says a lot of things," says Amy Sullivan at The New Republic. He claims to know Bacile, but it's pretty clear that no such person exists. AP and Wall Street Journal reporters separately traced the cellphone numbers they used to talk to "Bacile" back to Nakoula's house, journalists camping outside the house Thursday noticed striking similarities between Nakoula's property and scenes from the movie, and federal law enforcement sources told the AP they've concluded that Nakoula was the driving force behind the film. Also, the aliases Nakoula used in his financial fraud include different iterations of Bacily and Bassely.

Are there any alternate theories?
Sort of. Jimmy Israel, a man who says he briefly worked on the movie as a producer, tells BuzzFeed's John Herrman that Bacile had him register the film with SAG under the name Abnob Nakoula Basseley, and an actor who worked on the film sent a check from the gig signed Abanob Basseley Nakoula — apparently Nakoula's 21-year-old son, according to California birth records. But Israel describes Bacile as in his 50s, like Nakoula, and given Nakoula's history with bank fraud and the terms of his probation, says BuzzFeed's Herrman, he "may have been using his son's name for legal reasons." So all in all, Israel's story is actually "consistent with the theory that Bacile is Nakoula."

Why did he allegedly make the film?
With all the shadiness and deception, it's not clear. "Sam Bacile" told the AP that "Islam is a cancer," suggesting he was looking for a cure. A self-described adviser to the film, Christian activist Steve Stein, has said the purpose was to trick Muslims into learning the supposedly sordid "truth" about their Prophet Mohammed. "Sam said the intent of the film was to get extremist Muslims to stop killing," Klein told The New York Times on Thursday. If that's true, Nakoula couldn't have "thought through many details of his grand plan," says The New Republic's Sullivan. Ending Islamist violence by defaming Mohammed is "something even Wile E. Coyote would see couldn't possibly work," and all Nakoula has really done is put Egypt's Coptic Christians — his people — in mortal danger. On the other hand, "if it was a deliberate attempt to incite violence in the Middle East, then he was sadly successful," say Noah Shachtman and Robert Beckhusen at Wired. "What wasn't successful were the poor attempts at using fraudulent names to cover his tracks."

What happens to Nakoula now?
The FBI is investigating the killing in Libya of Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other U.S. diplomatic personnel, although it's not clear if Nakoula is part of that inquiry. Other than presumably violating the terms of his parole, it's hard to see what crime Nakoula has committed. The only thing that is clear is that we don't know the whole story, says BuzzFeed's Herrman, and what we do know is "phenomenally strange."

Sources: AP, BuzzFeed, Daily Beast, Los Angeles Times, New Republic, New York Times, Pasadena Star-News, Wired

Burning Question

posted on September 14, 2012, at 6:45 AM

A screengrab from the violence-inciting trailer of Innocence of Muslims: The U.S. government says the movie was made by Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, a Los Angeles-area Egyptian Coptic Christian with a rap sheet.

A screengrab from the violence-inciting trailer of Innocence of Muslims: The U.S. government says the movie was made by Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, a Los Angeles-area Egyptian Coptic Christian with a rap sheet. Photo: YouTube SEE ALL 114 PHOTOS

The hunt for Sam Bacile, the driving force behind the Islam-defaming movie sparking violent anti-U.S. protests in the Middle East, appears to be over. And he is not the Israeli real estate developer he claimed to be, or even named Sam Bacile. Instead, he's an Egyptian Coptic Christian ex-convict named Nakoula Basseley Nakoula. Who is Nakoula, what's his connection to the troublesome film, and what does he want? Here's a look:

What do we know about Nakoula B. Nakoula?
He's a 55-year-old gas station owner in the Los Angeles suburbs with a rap sheet dating back to the 1990s and an impressive list of aliases. The Daily Beast, citing a source close to the Los Angeles D.A.'s office, says Nakoula pleaded guilty in 1997 to cooking methamphetamine and was sentenced to a year in county jail; he reportedly served another year after violating his parole in 2002. In 2000, he declared bankruptcy for his gas station. In 2010, he was convicted in federal court of a year-long scheme in which he created fake bank accounts with stolen Social Security numbers, then withdrew money on fraudulent checks before they bounced. He was ordered to pay $794,700 in restitution and stay off computers and the internet without explicit permission for five years, and served about a year of a 21-month sentence.

How certain is it that Nakoula is the filmmaker?
The evidence is strong but largely circumstantial. Nakoula admits to offering logistical support for the company that created the film but denies — to both the AP and local Coptic Orthodox prelate Bishop Serapion — that he is Sam Bacile. Then again, "Nakoula says a lot of things," says Amy Sullivan at The New Republic. He claims to know Bacile, but it's pretty clear that no such person exists. AP and Wall Street Journal reporters separately traced the cellphone numbers they used to talk to "Bacile" back to Nakoula's house, journalists camping outside the house Thursday noticed striking similarities between Nakoula's property and scenes from the movie, and federal law enforcement sources told the AP they've concluded that Nakoula was the driving force behind the film. Also, the aliases Nakoula used in his financial fraud include different iterations of Bacily and Bassely.

Are there any alternate theories?
Sort of. Jimmy Israel, a man who says he briefly worked on the movie as a producer, tells BuzzFeed's John Herrman that Bacile had him register the film with SAG under the name Abnob Nakoula Basseley, and an actor who worked on the film sent a check from the gig signed Abanob Basseley Nakoula — apparently Nakoula's 21-year-old son, according to California birth records. But Israel describes Bacile as in his 50s, like Nakoula, and given Nakoula's history with bank fraud and the terms of his probation, says BuzzFeed's Herrman, he "may have been using his son's name for legal reasons." So all in all, Israel's story is actually "consistent with the theory that Bacile is Nakoula."

Why did he allegedly make the film?
With all the shadiness and deception, it's not clear. "Sam Bacile" told the AP that "Islam is a cancer," suggesting he was looking for a cure. A self-described adviser to the film, Christian activist Steve Stein, has said the purpose was to trick Muslims into learning the supposedly sordid "truth" about their Prophet Mohammed. "Sam said the intent of the film was to get extremist Muslims to stop killing," Klein told The New York Times on Thursday. If that's true, Nakoula couldn't have "thought through many details of his grand plan," says The New Republic's Sullivan. Ending Islamist violence by defaming Mohammed is "something even Wile E. Coyote would see couldn't possibly work," and all Nakoula has really done is put Egypt's Coptic Christians — his people — in mortal danger. On the other hand, "if it was a deliberate attempt to incite violence in the Middle East, then he was sadly successful," say Noah Shachtman and Robert Beckhusen at Wired. "What wasn't successful were the poor attempts at using fraudulent names to cover his tracks."

What happens to Nakoula now?
The FBI is investigating the killing in Libya of Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other U.S. diplomatic personnel, although it's not clear if Nakoula is part of that inquiry. Other than presumably violating the terms of his parole, it's hard to see what crime Nakoula has committed. The only thing that is clear is that we don't know the whole story, says BuzzFeed's Herrman, and what we do know is "phenomenally strange."

Sources: AP, BuzzFeed, Daily Beast, Los Angeles Times, New Republic, New York Times, Pasadena Star-News, Wired

The Filmmaker Who Made the Anti-Islam Video That Sparked Violent Mideast Protests Is a Ghost

The Filmmaker Who Made the Anti-Islam Video That Sparked Violent Mideast Protests Is a GhostThe attack on the U.S. embassy in Libya that left a U.S. ambassador and three embassy employees dead is being linked to protests over a YouTube trailer for a shitty satirical film about the prophet Muhammed. But the film's creator, a man who goes by the name "Sam Bacile," is a mystery.

The film that's thrown the Middle East into turmoil is a 14-minute trailer for the film "Innocence of Muslims" (or the "Life of Muhammed," or "Muslim Innocence, depending on reports). It depicts Muhammed as pedophile and doofus, and is filled with slapstick insults at Muslims. The movie is almost hilariously amateurish, like a Muslim version of Life of Brian shot by second-year film students. The trailer was posted to Youtube back in July, but was recently translated into Arabic and broadcast on Egyptian TV by a popular Cairo television host, Sheikh Khaled Abdallah, according to the Guardian. Hence the new protests.

The film's director and writer, "Sam Bacile," has since gone into hiding and is speaking to reporters from an "undisclosed location." Bacile told reporters he's an Israeli real estate developer living in California, and shot the film over three months in the summer of 2011 with $5 million put up by "100 Jewish donors."

The guy explicitly made the film to piss of Muslims, judging from his interviews. "Islam is a cancer," he's told multiple reporters. "This is a political movie, the U.S. lost a lot of money and a lot of people in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan," he told the Washington Post, "but we're fighting with ideas"

But web and public record searches bring up no evidence of the supposed real estate mogul. The Israeli government told the Post they couldn't find records Sam Bacile was a citizen. Even Bacile's age is a mystery: He told the Wall Street Journal he was 52, but told the AP he's 56, as pointed out by Religion Dispatch. His YouTube page says he's 75.

Even more puzzling: It cost $5 million? That video?

Bacile, the producer of the film, is not Israeli, and most likely not Jewish, as has been reported, and that the name is, in fact, a pseudonym. He said he did not know "Bacile"'s real name. He said Bacile contacted him because he leads anti-Islam protests outside of mosques and schools, and because, he said, he is a Vietnam veteran and an expert on uncovering al Qaeda cells in California. "After 9/11 I went out to look for terror cells in California and found them, piece of cake. Sam found out about me. The Middle East Christian and Jewish communities trust me."

Klein told Golbderg that around 15 people were involved in the making of the film, "They're from Syria, Turkey, Pakistan, they're some that are from Egypt. Some are Copts but the vast majority are Evangelical," he told Golbderg.

Why did Bacile pretend to be an Israeli Jew? Maybe he cooked up the persona and shadowy cabal of Jewish funders in an attempt to further inflame the situation. The only thing we know for sure about Bacile: He's a terrible filmmaker. If you know anything else, please email me: Adrian@gawker.com

Update: Even more bizarrely, On the Media points out that all the references to Islam in the trailer were dubbed, added in post-production over apparently more innocuous lines.

Sarah Abdurrahman writes:

I can't help but wonder if the actors involved in the project were told what kind of film they were making. If you remove all the references to Islam in the trailer, the movie reads like some cheesy Arabian Nights story, and it is quite possible that that is all the actors thought they were doing.

The Filmmaker Who Made the Anti-Islam Video That Sparked Violent Mideast Protests Is a GhostThe attack on the U.S. embassy in Libya that left a U.S. ambassador and three embassy employees dead is being linked to protests over a YouTube trailer for a shitty satirical film about the prophet Muhammed. But the film's creator, a man who goes by the name "Sam Bacile," is a mystery.

The film that's thrown the Middle East into turmoil is a 14-minute trailer for the film "Innocence of Muslims" (or the "Life of Muhammed," or "Muslim Innocence, depending on reports). It depicts Muhammed as pedophile and doofus, and is filled with slapstick insults at Muslims. The movie is almost hilariously amateurish, like a Muslim version of Life of Brian shot by second-year film students. The trailer was posted to Youtube back in July, but was recently translated into Arabic and broadcast on Egyptian TV by a popular Cairo television host, Sheikh Khaled Abdallah, according to the Guardian. Hence the new protests.

The film's director and writer, "Sam Bacile," has since gone into hiding and is speaking to reporters from an "undisclosed location." Bacile told reporters he's an Israeli real estate developer living in California, and shot the film over three months in the summer of 2011 with $5 million put up by "100 Jewish donors."

The guy explicitly made the film to piss of Muslims, judging from his interviews. "Islam is a cancer," he's told multiple reporters. "This is a political movie, the U.S. lost a lot of money and a lot of people in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan," he told the Washington Post, "but we're fighting with ideas"

But web and public record searches bring up no evidence of the supposed real estate mogul. The Israeli government told the Post they couldn't find records Sam Bacile was a citizen. Even Bacile's age is a mystery: He told the Wall Street Journal he was 52, but told the AP he's 56, as pointed out by Religion Dispatch. His YouTube page says he's 75.

Even more puzzling: It cost $5 million? That video?

Bacile, the producer of the film, is not Israeli, and most likely not Jewish, as has been reported, and that the name is, in fact, a pseudonym. He said he did not know "Bacile"'s real name. He said Bacile contacted him because he leads anti-Islam protests outside of mosques and schools, and because, he said, he is a Vietnam veteran and an expert on uncovering al Qaeda cells in California. "After 9/11 I went out to look for terror cells in California and found them, piece of cake. Sam found out about me. The Middle East Christian and Jewish communities trust me."

Klein told Golbderg that around 15 people were involved in the making of the film, "They're from Syria, Turkey, Pakistan, they're some that are from Egypt. Some are Copts but the vast majority are Evangelical," he told Golbderg.

Why did Bacile pretend to be an Israeli Jew? Maybe he cooked up the persona and shadowy cabal of Jewish funders in an attempt to further inflame the situation. The only thing we know for sure about Bacile: He's a terrible filmmaker. If you know anything else, please email me: Adrian@gawker.com

Update: Even more bizarrely, On the Media points out that all the references to Islam in the trailer were dubbed, added in post-production over apparently more innocuous lines.

Sarah Abdurrahman writes:

I can't help but wonder if the actors involved in the project were told what kind of film they were making. If you remove all the references to Islam in the trailer, the movie reads like some cheesy Arabian Nights story, and it is quite possible that that is all the actors thought they were doing.

Angry protests spread over anti-Islam video - Middle East - Al Jazeera English

Angry demonstrations against an anti-Islam film made in the US have spread to several countries across the Middle East and North Africa.

Clashes between police and demonstrators near the US embassy in Sanaa on Thursday killed four people, a security official said.

"Four people were killed and 34 others were wounded in the clashes that lasted from morning until late in the evening" in the area around the US embassy in Sanaa, the official said.

Earlier on Thursday, a security official said that Yemeni police shot dead a protester in confrontations outside the embassy, shortly after ejecting crowds that briefly stormed the mission's compound.

The protesters removed the embassy's sign on the outer wall and brought down the US flag and burned it, according to witnesses.

A number of diplomatic vehicles were torched as security forces used water cannons and warning shots in a bid to drive them out.

In Egypt, 224 people were injured in protests, eight of whom needed to be transfered to hospital, the health ministry said.

In Libya, where the US ambassador and three embassy staff were killed during protests in Benghazi on Tuesday, officials said they had made "four arrests" over the attack.

In the Iranian capital, Tehran, up to 500 people protested over the issue chanting "Death to America!" and death to the movie's director, an AFP photographer at the scene said.

The rally, near the Swiss embassy that handles US interests in the absence of US-Iran diplomatic ties, ended peacefully two hours later.

US flags burned

Meanwhile, Egypt's President Mohamed Morsi has condemned the film that has sparked an outcry in his country.

"We Egyptians reject any kind of assault or insult against our prophet. I condemn and oppose all who... insult our prophet," Morsi, on an official visit to Brussels, said in remarks broadcast by Egyptian state television.

President Morsi appealed for calm, saying Egyptians "reject any kind of assault" against Prophet Muhammad

"[But] it is our duty to protect our guests and visitors from abroad... I call on everyone to take that into consideration, to not violate Egyptian law... to not assault embassies," he added.

Egyptians have clashed with police outside US embassy in the capital, Cairo, for the third day.

About 30 people have been injured, including more than 10 riot police in the overnight clashes, as the fallout from a film ridiculing Islam's prophet continued to rage on Thursday.

Police have used tear gas to disperse the crowd, as interior ministry said at least 12 people have been arrested.

American flags were also burned in Tunisia, outside the US embassy in the capital, Tunis.

Police fired tear gas at demonstrators who shouted their opposition to the film, and chanted slogans against the US.

A small crowd also burned an American flag in Gaza City where Hamas, the elected government there, has condemned the film.

Despite the Egyptian government's call for calm, protesters chanted in the streets and fires burned.

Innocence of Muslims, the film that mocked Prophet Muhammad, was allegedly produced in the US by a filmmaker with ties to Coptic Christian groups, and excerpted on YouTube with dubbing in Arabic.

On Wednesday, about 200 demonstrators took part in protests in the Egyptian capital.

They rallied into the night chanting "leave Egypt" but there was however no repeat of the previous day's events when angry crowds climbed the walls of the complex and tore down an American flag, which they replaced briefly with a black, Islamist flag.

YouTube block

Meanwhile, YouTube, the video website owned by Google Inc, has said it will not remove the film clip, but it has blocked access to it in those countries.

 

Al Jazeera's Rosiland Jordan reports on US-Middle East relations following protests 

The Afghan government has ordered an indefinite ban on YouTube to prevent access to the film deemed offensive to Muslims, officials said on Thursday.

The US prosecutor-general said on Wednesday that four people were being questioned after Tuesday's events.

Nine Coptic Egyptian-Americans were also put on an airport watch list. They are believed to have contributed to the production of the anti-Islam film that led to the embassy protest.

The man behind the protests told Al Jazeera he just wanted to combat insults against Islam through legal and peaceful means. Wesam Abdel Wareth, the protest organiser, said his group was not happy that young people who joined their protest brought down the US flag.

He also said there was no co-ordination with protesters in Libya, and he condemned the violence there.

On Tuesday, Egypt's prestigious Al-Azhar mosque condemned a symbolic "trial" of the Prophet organised by a US group, including Terry Jones, a Christian pastor who triggered riots in Afghanistan in 2010 by threatening to burn the Quran.

But it was not immediately clear whether the event sponsored by Jones also prompted the embassy events.

Egypt 'neither enemy, nor ally'

Meanwhile, US President Barack Obama has called the leaders of Egypt and Libya to discuss security co-operation following the violence in Cairo and Benghazi, the White House has said.

Iraqi supporters of Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr burn Israeli and US flags in the Iraqi city of Kut [AFP]

Obama urged Egypt to uphold its commitments to defend US diplomatic facilities and personnel and called on Libya to work with US authorities to bring those behind the deadly attack on the US consulate to justice.

Morsi promised Egypt "would honour its obligation to ensure the safety of American personnel", the White House said.

Obama told Morsi that while "he rejects efforts to denigrate Islam ... there is never any justification for violence against innocents".

Whatever the cause, the events appeared to underscore how much the ground in the Middle East has shifted for Washington, which for decades had close ties with Arab dictators who could be counted on to crush dissent.

Obama's administration in recent weeks had appeared to overcome some of its initial caution after the election of Morsi, offering his government desperately needed debt relief and backing for international loans.

Egypt is neither an ally nor an enemy of the United States, Obama said on Wednesday.

"I don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy," Obama said in excerpts of an interview with Telemundo aired by MSNBC.

1162

Angry demonstrations against an anti-Islam film made in the US have spread to several countries across the Middle East and North Africa.

Clashes between police and demonstrators near the US embassy in Sanaa on Thursday killed four people, a security official said.

"Four people were killed and 34 others were wounded in the clashes that lasted from morning until late in the evening" in the area around the US embassy in Sanaa, the official said.

Earlier on Thursday, a security official said that Yemeni police shot dead a protester in confrontations outside the embassy, shortly after ejecting crowds that briefly stormed the mission's compound.

The protesters removed the embassy's sign on the outer wall and brought down the US flag and burned it, according to witnesses.

A number of diplomatic vehicles were torched as security forces used water cannons and warning shots in a bid to drive them out.

In Egypt, 224 people were injured in protests, eight of whom needed to be transfered to hospital, the health ministry said.

In Libya, where the US ambassador and three embassy staff were killed during protests in Benghazi on Tuesday, officials said they had made "four arrests" over the attack.

In the Iranian capital, Tehran, up to 500 people protested over the issue chanting "Death to America!" and death to the movie's director, an AFP photographer at the scene said.

The rally, near the Swiss embassy that handles US interests in the absence of US-Iran diplomatic ties, ended peacefully two hours later.

US flags burned

Meanwhile, Egypt's President Mohamed Morsi has condemned the film that has sparked an outcry in his country.

"We Egyptians reject any kind of assault or insult against our prophet. I condemn and oppose all who... insult our prophet," Morsi, on an official visit to Brussels, said in remarks broadcast by Egyptian state television.

President Morsi appealed for calm, saying Egyptians "reject any kind of assault" against Prophet Muhammad

"[But] it is our duty to protect our guests and visitors from abroad... I call on everyone to take that into consideration, to not violate Egyptian law... to not assault embassies," he added.

Egyptians have clashed with police outside US embassy in the capital, Cairo, for the third day.

About 30 people have been injured, including more than 10 riot police in the overnight clashes, as the fallout from a film ridiculing Islam's prophet continued to rage on Thursday.

Police have used tear gas to disperse the crowd, as interior ministry said at least 12 people have been arrested.

American flags were also burned in Tunisia, outside the US embassy in the capital, Tunis.

Police fired tear gas at demonstrators who shouted their opposition to the film, and chanted slogans against the US.

A small crowd also burned an American flag in Gaza City where Hamas, the elected government there, has condemned the film.

Despite the Egyptian government's call for calm, protesters chanted in the streets and fires burned.

Innocence of Muslims, the film that mocked Prophet Muhammad, was allegedly produced in the US by a filmmaker with ties to Coptic Christian groups, and excerpted on YouTube with dubbing in Arabic.

On Wednesday, about 200 demonstrators took part in protests in the Egyptian capital.

They rallied into the night chanting "leave Egypt" but there was however no repeat of the previous day's events when angry crowds climbed the walls of the complex and tore down an American flag, which they replaced briefly with a black, Islamist flag.

YouTube block

Meanwhile, YouTube, the video website owned by Google Inc, has said it will not remove the film clip, but it has blocked access to it in those countries.

 

Al Jazeera's Rosiland Jordan reports on US-Middle East relations following protests 

The Afghan government has ordered an indefinite ban on YouTube to prevent access to the film deemed offensive to Muslims, officials said on Thursday.

The US prosecutor-general said on Wednesday that four people were being questioned after Tuesday's events.

Nine Coptic Egyptian-Americans were also put on an airport watch list. They are believed to have contributed to the production of the anti-Islam film that led to the embassy protest.

The man behind the protests told Al Jazeera he just wanted to combat insults against Islam through legal and peaceful means. Wesam Abdel Wareth, the protest organiser, said his group was not happy that young people who joined their protest brought down the US flag.

He also said there was no co-ordination with protesters in Libya, and he condemned the violence there.

On Tuesday, Egypt's prestigious Al-Azhar mosque condemned a symbolic "trial" of the Prophet organised by a US group, including Terry Jones, a Christian pastor who triggered riots in Afghanistan in 2010 by threatening to burn the Quran.

But it was not immediately clear whether the event sponsored by Jones also prompted the embassy events.

Egypt 'neither enemy, nor ally'

Meanwhile, US President Barack Obama has called the leaders of Egypt and Libya to discuss security co-operation following the violence in Cairo and Benghazi, the White House has said.

Iraqi supporters of Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr burn Israeli and US flags in the Iraqi city of Kut [AFP]

Obama urged Egypt to uphold its commitments to defend US diplomatic facilities and personnel and called on Libya to work with US authorities to bring those behind the deadly attack on the US consulate to justice.

Morsi promised Egypt "would honour its obligation to ensure the safety of American personnel", the White House said.

Obama told Morsi that while "he rejects efforts to denigrate Islam ... there is never any justification for violence against innocents".

Whatever the cause, the events appeared to underscore how much the ground in the Middle East has shifted for Washington, which for decades had close ties with Arab dictators who could be counted on to crush dissent.

Obama's administration in recent weeks had appeared to overcome some of its initial caution after the election of Morsi, offering his government desperately needed debt relief and backing for international loans.

Egypt is neither an ally nor an enemy of the United States, Obama said on Wednesday.

"I don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy," Obama said in excerpts of an interview with Telemundo aired by MSNBC.

1162

Violence Over Anti-Islam Video Enters Day 4

Demonstrations continued for a fourth day across the Muslim world over an amateur American-made anti-Islamic video. U.S. and other foreign missions have stepped up security following violent attacks that began Tuesday.

 

Protesters in several cities across the Middle East, Africa, and south and east Asia spread out after Friday's midday prayers, denouncing the video and those they feel have not done enough to stop it.

 

Demonstrations continued near the U.S. embassy in Cairo, with protesters throwing rocks at riot police, who responded with tear gas.

 

The violence also spread to Sudan, where witnesses said demonstrators breached the German embassy. Hundreds of protesters in Tripoli, Lebanon, set fire to a KFC fast-food restaurant.

 

Protests were also reported in Malaysia and Indonesia, and security was tight in Kabul, Afghanistan, even though there were no demonstrations.

Video of Middle East protests

​​

 

In Benghazi, where the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other American personnel were killed in an attack Tuesday, security was stepped up around the city and the airport temporarily closed.

  

U.S. warships are headed to the Libyan coast, while additional U.S. Marine guards were deployed to protect the American embassy in Yemen. Protesters Friday were pushed back from the embassy with water canon and warning shots, after demonstrators breached the wall the day before.

 

Cairo responds

 

In many Cairo mosques Friday, the video, a crudely-made attempt to mock the Prophet Muhammad, was the topic of the day. One imam reminded worshippers that Egyptians, under their new Islamist government, can now openly defend the prophet from such insults.

 

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has condemned the video. He spoke out again Friday on the need to keep protests in check, saying Egypt will never accept the killing of innocents, or attacks on diplomatic missions or personnel. He added it is every government's duty, including Egypt's, to protect ambassadors, missions and tourists.

 

The appeal for restraint followed what is being described as a frank telephone call overnight between Morsi and U.S. President Barack Obama. The Egyptian leader is reported to have brought up the video, while president Obama stressed Egypt's obligation to protect the embassy.

 

Obama spoke Thursday about the relationship between the U.S. and Egypt. "I don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy," said the president. "They are a new government that's trying to find its way. They were democratically elected. I think we have to see how they respond to this incident."

 

Egyptian security forces were building a barrier Friday to block the route to the embassy. Egyptian police used tear gas earlier to break up the protests.

 

Arrests

 

Libyan officials said Thursday that they have arrested four people in connection with this week's assault on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi that killed U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three of his staff: information-technology specialist Sean Smith and former Navy SEALS Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty. The officials did not provide details.

 

American intelligence agencies are examining the alleged involvement of pro-al-Qaida militants. 

 

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton condemned the amateur U.S.-made movie that mocks the Islamic Prophet Muhammad. She called it "disgusting" and "reprehensible."

 

Tracing the Video

 

"Innocence of Muslims" Movie
  • Excerpts of the film were posted on YouTube in English and Arabic
  • The film depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a caricature
  • Reportedly financed by expatriate members of Egypt's Coptic Christian minority group
  • Promoted by Florida-based Christian Pastor Terry Jones, who burned a Quran in his church
​​A trailer for the anti-Islamic video was posted on YouTube in July. An Arabic-language translation began circulating in the Middle East in recent days. Clips from the movie depict the Prophet Muhammad as a villainous, homosexual, child-molesting buffoon, among other overtly insulting claims.

 

The film has been widely condemned across the globe and in the United States.

 

Called "The Innocence of Muslims," the film was said to have been produced by a man named Sam Bacile, who told news media he is Israeli-American. A consultant on the film says that name is a pseudonym, and there are suggestions that the man behind the film is an Egyptian Coptic Christian who lives in California. There is no record of the film or its producer in Hollywood reference sources.

 

Several news organizations have linked the inflammatory film to an Egyptian American, 55-year-old Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, who lives in California and once was convicted of bank fraud. Nakoula says he handled logistics for the production.

 

Another California man who says he served as a consultant, Steve Klein, has given conflicting accounts of the film's origin and funding. Klein is the founder of anti-Muslim and other hate groups.


VOA's Mike O'Sullivan in Los Angeles contributed to this report

Demonstrations continued for a fourth day across the Muslim world over an amateur American-made anti-Islamic video. U.S. and other foreign missions have stepped up security following violent attacks that began Tuesday.

 

Protesters in several cities across the Middle East, Africa, and south and east Asia spread out after Friday's midday prayers, denouncing the video and those they feel have not done enough to stop it.

 

Demonstrations continued near the U.S. embassy in Cairo, with protesters throwing rocks at riot police, who responded with tear gas.

 

The violence also spread to Sudan, where witnesses said demonstrators breached the German embassy. Hundreds of protesters in Tripoli, Lebanon, set fire to a KFC fast-food restaurant.

 

Protests were also reported in Malaysia and Indonesia, and security was tight in Kabul, Afghanistan, even though there were no demonstrations.

Video of Middle East protests

​​

 

In Benghazi, where the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other American personnel were killed in an attack Tuesday, security was stepped up around the city and the airport temporarily closed.

  

U.S. warships are headed to the Libyan coast, while additional U.S. Marine guards were deployed to protect the American embassy in Yemen. Protesters Friday were pushed back from the embassy with water canon and warning shots, after demonstrators breached the wall the day before.

 

Cairo responds

 

In many Cairo mosques Friday, the video, a crudely-made attempt to mock the Prophet Muhammad, was the topic of the day. One imam reminded worshippers that Egyptians, under their new Islamist government, can now openly defend the prophet from such insults.

 

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has condemned the video. He spoke out again Friday on the need to keep protests in check, saying Egypt will never accept the killing of innocents, or attacks on diplomatic missions or personnel. He added it is every government's duty, including Egypt's, to protect ambassadors, missions and tourists.

 

The appeal for restraint followed what is being described as a frank telephone call overnight between Morsi and U.S. President Barack Obama. The Egyptian leader is reported to have brought up the video, while president Obama stressed Egypt's obligation to protect the embassy.

 

Obama spoke Thursday about the relationship between the U.S. and Egypt. "I don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy," said the president. "They are a new government that's trying to find its way. They were democratically elected. I think we have to see how they respond to this incident."

 

Egyptian security forces were building a barrier Friday to block the route to the embassy. Egyptian police used tear gas earlier to break up the protests.

 

Arrests

 

Libyan officials said Thursday that they have arrested four people in connection with this week's assault on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi that killed U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three of his staff: information-technology specialist Sean Smith and former Navy SEALS Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty. The officials did not provide details.

 

American intelligence agencies are examining the alleged involvement of pro-al-Qaida militants. 

 

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton condemned the amateur U.S.-made movie that mocks the Islamic Prophet Muhammad. She called it "disgusting" and "reprehensible."

 

Tracing the Video

 

"Innocence of Muslims" Movie
  • Excerpts of the film were posted on YouTube in English and Arabic
  • The film depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a caricature
  • Reportedly financed by expatriate members of Egypt's Coptic Christian minority group
  • Promoted by Florida-based Christian Pastor Terry Jones, who burned a Quran in his church
​​A trailer for the anti-Islamic video was posted on YouTube in July. An Arabic-language translation began circulating in the Middle East in recent days. Clips from the movie depict the Prophet Muhammad as a villainous, homosexual, child-molesting buffoon, among other overtly insulting claims.

 

The film has been widely condemned across the globe and in the United States.

 

Called "The Innocence of Muslims," the film was said to have been produced by a man named Sam Bacile, who told news media he is Israeli-American. A consultant on the film says that name is a pseudonym, and there are suggestions that the man behind the film is an Egyptian Coptic Christian who lives in California. There is no record of the film or its producer in Hollywood reference sources.

 

Several news organizations have linked the inflammatory film to an Egyptian American, 55-year-old Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, who lives in California and once was convicted of bank fraud. Nakoula says he handled logistics for the production.

 

Another California man who says he served as a consultant, Steve Klein, has given conflicting accounts of the film's origin and funding. Klein is the founder of anti-Muslim and other hate groups.


VOA's Mike O'Sullivan in Los Angeles contributed to this report

Egypt Islamists call for ‘peaceful’ protests against ‘anti-Islam’ film

People shout slogans in front of the U.S. embassy during a protest against what they said was a film being produced in the United States that was insulting to the Prophet Mohammad, in Cairo. (Reuters)

People shout slogans in front of the U.S. embassy during a protest against what they said was a film being produced in the United States that was insulting to the Prophet Mohammad, in Cairo. (Reuters)

Egypt’s powerful Muslim Brotherhood on Wednesday called for nationwide protests Friday after a film deemed offensive to Islam sparked a deadly attack in Libya and furious protests in Cairo.

The Brotherhood calls “for peaceful protests on Friday outside all the main mosques in all of Egypt’s provinces to denounce offences to religion and to the Prophet,” the Muslim Brotherhood’s Secretary General Mahmud Hussein said in a statement.

He also urged all “national forces to join the protests.”

The Muslim Brotherhood, from which President Mohammed Mursi emerged, is the largest and most organized political force in the country.

The call for protests comes after a film portraying the life of the Prophet Mohammed, which touches on themes of paedophilia and homosexuality, sparked a deadly attack in Libya that left America's ambassador Chris Stevens and three American officials dead.

The film was produced by Israeli-American Sam Bacile, according to the Wall Street Journal, but Egyptian media say that some Egyptian Copts living in the U.S. were involved in the production.

The Muslim Brotherhood’s political arm, the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) strongly condemned the film which it described as “a racist crime and a failed attempt to provoke sectarian strife between the two elements of the nation: Muslims and Christians.”

The film, which depicts the Prophet Mohammed as promiscuous and talking about killing children, “goes far beyond all reasonable boundaries of the freedoms of opinion and expression.”

“The FJP affirms that both elements of the Egyptian people -- Christians and Muslims -- have been and will always be united in the face of such despicable attempts that seek to foment conflict in this homeland, and to throw it in a deep abyss, a never-ending spiral of violence,” the party said.

People shout slogans in front of the U.S. embassy during a protest against what they said was a film being produced in the United States that was insulting to the Prophet Mohammad, in Cairo. (Reuters)

People shout slogans in front of the U.S. embassy during a protest against what they said was a film being produced in the United States that was insulting to the Prophet Mohammad, in Cairo. (Reuters)

Egypt’s powerful Muslim Brotherhood on Wednesday called for nationwide protests Friday after a film deemed offensive to Islam sparked a deadly attack in Libya and furious protests in Cairo.

The Brotherhood calls “for peaceful protests on Friday outside all the main mosques in all of Egypt’s provinces to denounce offences to religion and to the Prophet,” the Muslim Brotherhood’s Secretary General Mahmud Hussein said in a statement.

He also urged all “national forces to join the protests.”

The Muslim Brotherhood, from which President Mohammed Mursi emerged, is the largest and most organized political force in the country.

The call for protests comes after a film portraying the life of the Prophet Mohammed, which touches on themes of paedophilia and homosexuality, sparked a deadly attack in Libya that left America's ambassador Chris Stevens and three American officials dead.

The film was produced by Israeli-American Sam Bacile, according to the Wall Street Journal, but Egyptian media say that some Egyptian Copts living in the U.S. were involved in the production.

The Muslim Brotherhood’s political arm, the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) strongly condemned the film which it described as “a racist crime and a failed attempt to provoke sectarian strife between the two elements of the nation: Muslims and Christians.”

The film, which depicts the Prophet Mohammed as promiscuous and talking about killing children, “goes far beyond all reasonable boundaries of the freedoms of opinion and expression.”

“The FJP affirms that both elements of the Egyptian people -- Christians and Muslims -- have been and will always be united in the face of such despicable attempts that seek to foment conflict in this homeland, and to throw it in a deep abyss, a never-ending spiral of violence,” the party said.

Libya Mission Attack Kills U.S. Ambassador - NYTimes.com

YouTube Blocks - WSJ.com

image

Google Inc.'s YouTube unit said it blocked a controversial video that negatively depicts the Prophet Muhammad from appearing in Muslim countries including Libya and Egypt, where anti-American riots took place in recent days.

The blocked video, which is available for viewing on YouTube's website in most countries, is a 14-minute segment billed as "Muhammad Movie Trailer." The clip depicts Muhammad as a sex-fueled womanizer, among other negative traits, and has been viewed more than 200,000 times since being published on the site in July.

YouTube says Egypt is the "top location" for viewers of the video, followed by Tunisia and Canada. A YouTube spokesman said that "given the very difficult situation in Libya and Egypt we have temporarily restricted access" to the video in both countries. But he added that the video is available on many other websites and "is clearly within our guidelines and so will stay on YouTube."

He added: "We work hard to create a community everyone can enjoy and which also enables people to express different opinions. This can be a challenge because what's OK in one country can be offensive elsewhere."

On Tuesday, protesters in Libya killed the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three of staff members, while rioters in Egypt, citing the film clip, stormed the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.

YouTube's spokesman declined to comment on whether the video was removed in response to requests from the two countries' governments, the U.S. government or others.

Defaming the Prophet Muhammad is illegal in some Middle Eastern countries, including Saudi Arabia and Iran, where the ruling governments try to apply the laws of Islam, said Tamer el-Leithy, a professor of Islamic studies at New York University.

Earlier this year, Google cited an "alarming" rise in the number of government requests that it take down content from its sites.

Over the past two years, Google said it restricted Internet users in Thailand from viewing hundreds of videos that insulted that monarchy. In Turkey, Google said last year it blocked some, but not all, videos that arms of the government said violated local laws that prohibit defaming the founder and first prime minister of Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

Write to Amir Efrati at amir.efrati@wsj.com

A version of this article appeared September 13, 2012, on page A9 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: YouTube Blocks Clip in Egypt And in Libya.

image

Google Inc.'s YouTube unit said it blocked a controversial video that negatively depicts the Prophet Muhammad from appearing in Muslim countries including Libya and Egypt, where anti-American riots took place in recent days.

The blocked video, which is available for viewing on YouTube's website in most countries, is a 14-minute segment billed as "Muhammad Movie Trailer." The clip depicts Muhammad as a sex-fueled womanizer, among other negative traits, and has been viewed more than 200,000 times since being published on the site in July.

YouTube says Egypt is the "top location" for viewers of the video, followed by Tunisia and Canada. A YouTube spokesman said that "given the very difficult situation in Libya and Egypt we have temporarily restricted access" to the video in both countries. But he added that the video is available on many other websites and "is clearly within our guidelines and so will stay on YouTube."

He added: "We work hard to create a community everyone can enjoy and which also enables people to express different opinions. This can be a challenge because what's OK in one country can be offensive elsewhere."

On Tuesday, protesters in Libya killed the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three of staff members, while rioters in Egypt, citing the film clip, stormed the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.

YouTube's spokesman declined to comment on whether the video was removed in response to requests from the two countries' governments, the U.S. government or others.

Defaming the Prophet Muhammad is illegal in some Middle Eastern countries, including Saudi Arabia and Iran, where the ruling governments try to apply the laws of Islam, said Tamer el-Leithy, a professor of Islamic studies at New York University.

Earlier this year, Google cited an "alarming" rise in the number of government requests that it take down content from its sites.

Over the past two years, Google said it restricted Internet users in Thailand from viewing hundreds of videos that insulted that monarchy. In Turkey, Google said last year it blocked some, but not all, videos that arms of the government said violated local laws that prohibit defaming the founder and first prime minister of Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

Write to Amir Efrati at amir.efrati@wsj.com

A version of this article appeared September 13, 2012, on page A9 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: YouTube Blocks Clip in Egypt And in Libya.